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Low Oil Prices Force Slowdown of U.S. Tar Sands Project

Low Oil Prices Force Slowdown of U.S. Tar Sands Project

A Canadian company’s efforts to produce oil sands in the United States are not dead, but thanks to crude oil prices that have dipped below $30 per barrel, they may be in critical condition. U.S. Oil Sands, the Alberta-based company working on a project slated to produce crude oil from oil sands on public lands in Utah, is slowing its PR Spring oil… Read More

Obama Confident in Climate Plan Despite Court Setback

Obama Confident in Climate Plan Despite Court Setback

The Obama administration is expressing confidence in its most sweeping climate change policy, despite the Supreme Court’s decision on Tuesday to block its enforcement while a major legal challenge works its way through the courts. The Clean Power Plan, which aims to cut power plant emissions by 32 percent by 2030 compared to 2005 levels … Read More

Countries Embrace New Rules to Limit Airline Emissions

Countries Embrace New Rules to Limit Airline Emissions

The United States and 22 other countries on Monday struck a first-ever international agreement to cut carbon emissions from commercial airplanes as a way to reduce their impact on climate change. The agreement, announced by the UN’s International Civil Aviation Organization, or ICAO, calls for a 4 percent reduction in fuel consumption from new … Read More

Weakening Ice Shelves Raise Sea Level Rise Concerns

Weakening Ice Shelves Raise Sea Level Rise Concerns

All along Antarctica’s coast, tongues of floating ice act as a firewall. Any major breaks in the firewall could send inland ice flowing faster to the sea, raising ocean levels and threatening coastal communities around the globe. In some ways, it’s a process already seen in some areas of Antarctica and it’s concerning enough that scientists have … Read More

Climate Change Is Leaving Native Plants Behind

Climate Change Is Leaving Native Plants Behind

Willis Linn Jepson encountered a squat shrub while he was collecting botanical specimens on California’s Mount Tamalpais in the fall of 1936. He trimmed off a few branches and jotted down the location along the ridge trail where the manzanita grew, 2,255 feet above sea level. The desiccated specimen is now part of an herbarium here that’s named … Read More

World’s Largest Offshore Wind Farm to Be Built in U.K.

World’s Largest Offshore Wind Farm to Be Built in U.K.

The U.K. wind energy industry received a boost this week with the announcement of the world’s biggest offshore wind farm, to be built off the north-east coast. Dong Energy said its multi-billion pound Hornsea project, which is expected when complete to power as many as 1m homes in the region, will occupy more than 400 square kilometers, situated… Read More

The Southwest May Have Entered a ‘Drier Climate State’

The Southwest May Have Entered a ‘Drier Climate State’

The Southwest is already the most arid part of the U.S. Now new research indicates it’s becoming even more dry as wet weather patterns, quite literally, dry up. The change could herald a pattern shift and raises the specter of megadrought in the region. “We see a very intense trend in the Southwest,” Andreas Prein, a postdoctoral researcher at the … Read More

These Paintings Turn Climate Data Into Art

These Paintings Turn Climate Data Into Art

Climate data is usually seen in pixels, spreadsheets and maps. But watercolors? Not so much. That’s what makes a growing series of paintings by Maine-based artist Jill Pelto so striking. They combine imagery from the natural world with hard data showing the impact climate change is having. The message can be subtle, with the global average … Read More

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Copenhagen Diagnosis Graphics informed by the Copenhagen Diagnosis, a major climate change report released on November 24, 2009.

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