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Canada Pushes Ahead with Alternatives to Keystone XL

Canada Pushes Ahead with Alternatives to Keystone XL

A decision on whether to allow the Keystone XL Pipeline to be built in the U.S. could come at any time, but there are myriad other projects on the table designed to do exactly what Keystone XL was designed to do: transport Canadian tar sands oil to refineries.… Read More

Wildfires Tied to Drought, Heat & Topography, Not Beetles

Wildfires Tied to Drought, Heat & Topography, Not Beetles

Climate change-driven drought and higher temperatures are among the biggest factors, in addition to topography, influencing wildfire spread in the West, according to a new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.… Read More

The West Coast Is in Hot Water

The West Coast Is in Hot Water

Move over polar bears. Are starving sea lion pups the new face of climate change? This year’s slew of hungry pups washing ashore in California, which has generated a slew of media coverage replete with heart-tugging images, has roots in natural temperature fluctuations in the ocean. But in the coming decades, human-induced warming could make these… Read More

Cities Could Be Ideal for Utility-Scale Solar Plants

Cities Could Be Ideal for Utility-Scale Solar Plants

Many solar power plants can be built in California’s cities, which are often overlooked as areas ideal for both utility-scale photovoltaic and concentrating solar power generations, a Stanford University study says. … Read More

Public Lands May Be America’s Best Climate Defense

Public Lands May Be America’s Best Climate Defense

Public lands protect forests that help store atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions while providing space for renewable energy development and protecting wildlife habitat and biodiversity, helping plants and animals adapt to climate change.… Read More

CO2 Boosts Trees, But Ups Damage From Forest Pests

CO2 Boosts Trees, But Ups Damage From Forest Pests

Scientists warn that damage inflicted by tiny forest pests could worsen as carbon dioxide levels rise. Early research suggests that attacks by caterpillars, beetles, termites and other insects in some forests could be enough to cancel out projected increases in tree growth rates. Forests are critical sponges for sucking carbon dioxide out of the ai… Read More

Sao Paulo’s Reservoirs Feel Pinch of Failed Wet Season

Sao Paulo’s Reservoirs Feel Pinch of Failed Wet Season

Sao Paulo, in the wake of another dry summer in southeast Brazil, continues to struggle with a multi-year drought. The city has implemented water rationing, but reservoir levels still hover at perilously low levels and will likely remain there or drop even further as the usual rainy season ends. What is traditionally the rainy season runs from Sept… Read More

Artificial Glaciers in India Help Drought-Hit Villages

Artificial Glaciers in India Help Drought-Hit Villages

Villagers of the high desert of Ladakh in India’s Jammu and Kashmir state used to harvest bountiful crops of barley, wheat, fruits, and vegetables in summer. But for years the streams have run dry in spring, just when farmers needed water to sow seeds. They had water when it wasn’t needed during the rest of the year, such as in winter, when Ladakhi… Read More

Gallery

Summer Precipitation Trends The wet are getting wetter and the dry are getting drier.

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