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Arctic Research Vessel Set Adrift to Study Sea Ice Decline

Arctic Research Vessel Set Adrift to Study Sea Ice Decline

A research vessel is adrift in the Arctic to study why sea ice is retreating faster than expected. Ice cover across the northern ocean fell to a new low last month, reaching just over 14.5 million sq kilometers (5.61 million square miles) at its winter peak, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center, in Colorado. That was 130,000 sq… Read More

Thawing Permafrost Will ‘Seep, Not Explode’ CO2

Thawing Permafrost Will ‘Seep, Not Explode’ CO2

The Arctic holds more than a trillion tons of carbon, locked in the frozen soil known as permafrost. That’s more than twice as much carbon as there is in the atmosphere itself, according to a 2013 report from the National Academy of Sciences. And as the climate warms under its growing blanket of human-generated greenhouse gases, thawing permafrost … Read More

Urban Sprawl, Cars Hamper Cities’ Best Efforts on CO2

Urban Sprawl, Cars Hamper Cities’ Best Efforts on CO2

A Boston University study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that a major push in cities like Denver to build dense housing, better transit systems and more bike lanes in their urban core doesn’t necessarily lead to lower per-capita CO2 emissions.… Read More

The Future of Mountain Glaciers Is Bleak

The Future of Mountain Glaciers Is Bleak

Melting ice in Greenland and Antarctica get far more attention, but mountain glaciers around the world — in the Rockies, the Andes, the Himalayas and other ranges — are melting as well as the planet heats up. All told, say climate modelers, the water they release could contribute about a foot’s worth of the 3 to 6 feet of sea level rise projected … Read More

Climate Change Makes Droughts in Australia Worse

Climate Change Makes Droughts in Australia Worse

Climate change is making drought conditions in southwest and southeast Australia worse, with serious ramifications for people’s health and the agriculture industry, a new paper has warned. The Climate Council report states that since the mid-1990s, southeast Australia has experienced a 15 percent drop in rainfall during late autumn and early winter… Read More

Hydropower Could be Risky Bet in Warming World

Hydropower Could be Risky Bet in Warming World

As investments in wind and solar power climb, backing major hydropower projects may be seen as a risky bet in a warming world, as studies show that reservoirs may be major sources of methane emissions and climate change itself could make rain and snowfall less certain in some regions.… Read More

Canada Pushes Ahead with Alternatives to Keystone XL

Canada Pushes Ahead with Alternatives to Keystone XL

A decision on whether to allow the Keystone XL Pipeline to be built in the U.S. could come at any time, but there are myriad other projects on the table designed to do exactly what Keystone XL was designed to do: transport Canadian tar sands oil to refineries.… Read More

Wildfires Tied to Drought, Heat & Topography, Not Beetles

Wildfires Tied to Drought, Heat & Topography, Not Beetles

Climate change-driven drought and higher temperatures are among the biggest factors, in addition to topography, influencing wildfire spread in the West, according to a new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.… Read More

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Ruthless Tornadoes of 2011 Photos from one of the worst tornado seasons to ever hit the U.S.

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