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Diving Enthusiasts Could Measure Ocean Temperatures

Diving Enthusiasts Could Measure Ocean Temperatures

Millions of holidaying scuba divers are able to become citizen scientists and take vital measurements of ocean temperatures, which are being driven up by climate change. More than 90 percent of the heat trapped by global warming goes into oceans, where it drives hurricanes and disrupts fish stocks. Satellites can measure surface temperature when … Read More

North American Forests Not a Climate Change Remedy

North American Forests Not a Climate Change Remedy

North American forests will not fight climate change by absorbing carbon dioxide at levels once hoped for because the trees may not grow big enough, a study said. The new research challenges previous studies that said trees could grow larger due to higher temperatures brought on by global warming, said the authors of the study published in the… Read More

Local Efforts to Save Coral Reefs May Be Futile

Local Efforts to Save Coral Reefs May Be Futile

Scientists agree that coral reefs will continue to be decimated if climate-changing pollution from fossil fuels, farming and deforestation is not addressed. They disagree, however, over whether local efforts to restrict fishing and reduce water pollution will make meaningful differences in a world of fast-rising temperatures.… Read More

The Hottest Cities in U.S. vs. the Fastest Warming

The Hottest Cities in U.S. vs. the Fastest Warming

Searing heat is the signature of climate change, and the scorching summer temperatures blanketing much of the nation this week are exactly what we should expect in an ever warming world. With the mercury rising, a host of Midwestern cities are forecast to see their hottest weather of the year. This comes on the heels of the hottest June ever … Read More

Global Climate Spending Focusing on Forest Protection

Global Climate Spending Focusing on Forest Protection

Forests straddling the equator are critical to a stable climate because they store vast amounts of carbon, and a new study finds that the U.S. and four other developed countries are spending billions of dollars to keep those forests intact. An analysis of how the U.S., Japan, Germany, France and Norway have donated money to climate change … Read More

Tanzania’s Maasai Facing Impacts of Climate Change

Tanzania’s Maasai Facing Impacts of Climate Change

The air across the plain sizzles in the 95-degree heat, blurring the image of the huts in the distance. There’s a 23-year-old Maasai warrior named Lekoko beside me and a group of 35 American tourists behind me. Despite having only spent three months learning English, Lekoko gives us a seamless tour of his boma, a circle of five clay huts… Read More

Court Decision on Climate Plan Jolts Carbon Prices

Court Decision on Climate Plan Jolts Carbon Prices

A temporary halt to the federal government’s plan to cut electric power plant emissions has caused carbon prices in the Northeast’s only cap-and-trade program to plummet, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. Carbon prices in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, or RGGI, have fallen 40 percent since the Supreme Court’s decision in … Read More

Here’s What Your July 4 Road Trip Means for the Climate

Here’s What Your July 4 Road Trip Means for the Climate

When an expected record-breaking 36 million Americans take their holiday road trips this Fourth of July weekend, they’ll be part of what is quickly becoming our nation’s biggest source of carbon dioxide emissions — transportation. This winter, for the first time since 1979, carbon dioxide emissions from cars, trucks and SUVs surpassed the carbon … Read More

Gallery

The Tale of Two Marches A look at the stark difference between March 2012 and March 2013 across the country.

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