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Stories from Climate Central's Science Journalists and Content Partners

Climate Change Takes Center Stage on Instagram

Climate Change Takes Center Stage on Instagram

Odorless, invisible gases cause the buildup of heat in the Earth’s atmosphere and oceans that lead to climate change. Those changes, such as shifts in rainfall patterns and the acidification of sea waters, are ones that happen in the long-term, relegating them to the background and making them hard to notice. The International Center for Photograph… Read More

Jack Frost Not Exactly Nipping at Your Nose

Jack Frost Not Exactly Nipping at Your Nose

The mercury has already dipped below 32°F at a number of locations around the U.S. in the Rockies and Upper Midwest. It’s only a matter of time before chilly temperatures march east and south as fall turns to winter, frosting over windowpanes, lawns and leaves. But Old Man Winter and Jack Frost are getting a later and later start to their usual fro… Read More

Drought Takes Hold as Amazon’s ‘Flying Rivers’ Dry Up

Drought Takes Hold as Amazon’s ‘Flying Rivers’ Dry Up

The unprecedented drought now affecting São Paulo, South America’s giant metropolis, is believed to be caused by the absence of the “flying rivers” − the vapor clouds from the Amazon that normally bring rain to the center and south of Brazil. Some Brazilian scientists say the absence of rain that has dried up rivers and reservoirs in central and so… Read More

New Analysis Shows Global Exposure to Sea Level Rise

New Analysis Shows Global Exposure to Sea Level Rise

Every global shore touches the same ocean, and the ocean is rising. Climate Central just completed a novel analysis of worldwide exposure to sea level rise and coastal flooding. We found that 147 to 216 million people live on land that will be below sea level or regular flood levels by the end of the century, assuming emissions of heat-trapping … Read More

Pacific Northwest Warming May Have Natural Roots

Pacific Northwest Warming May Have Natural Roots

Dan Nichols was hauling in a gillnet laden with the fruits of a late-season Alaskan salmon run when something heavy flopped out of it, then slid to the front of his boat. “I knew what the tail was,” he says. Surprised, the mustachioed fishing veteran stopped picking salmon from his net and approached the itinerant creature. “I had to stop what I wa… Read More

What Will Survive in Hot, Acidic Oceans?

What Will Survive in Hot, Acidic Oceans?

Marine losers abound in the hustling currents of warming and acidifying oceans. Trying to figure out which types of sea life, particularly those that form calcium carbonate-rich cells and exoskeletons, such as some plankton, corals, and shellfish, will thrive amid climate change can be like playing a high-stakes shell game. New research suggests t… Read More

The Good and Bad Climate News from Permafrost Melt

The Good and Bad Climate News from Permafrost Melt

Earth’s subterranean carbon blisters are starting to pop. Carbon inside now-melting permafrost is oozing out, leaving scientists scrambling to figure out just how much of it is ending up in the atmosphere. Whether recent findings from research that attempted to help answer this question are good or bad climate news might depend on whether you see … Read More

Time for Trees to Pack Their Trunks?

Time for Trees to Pack Their Trunks?

During the last two springs, contract planters for The Nature Conservancy have spread out through the pine, spruce and aspen forest of northeastern Minnesota. Wielding steel hoedads, they have planted almost 110,000 tree seedlings on public land. What’s noteworthy about planting trees in a forest? Usually foresters plant seedlings grown from seeds … Read More