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Stories from Climate Central's Science Journalists and Content Partners

Global Economy Becoming Less Energy Intense

Global Economy Becoming Less Energy Intense

The amount of coal, oil, gas and renewable energy used by the global economy is falling quickly, a clear sign that economic growth is having less of an impact on climate change than in the past, according to new data from the U.S. Department of Energy. The measure of the amount of energy that is used per unit of gross domestic product is known as … Read More

Local Efforts to Save Coral Reefs May Be Futile

Local Efforts to Save Coral Reefs May Be Futile

Scientists agree that coral reefs will continue to be decimated if climate-changing pollution from fossil fuels, farming and deforestation is not addressed. They disagree, however, over whether local efforts to restrict fishing and reduce water pollution will make meaningful differences in a world of fast-rising temperatures.… Read More

Global Climate Spending Focusing on Forest Protection

Global Climate Spending Focusing on Forest Protection

Forests straddling the equator are critical to a stable climate because they store vast amounts of carbon, and a new study finds that the U.S. and four other developed countries are spending billions of dollars to keep those forests intact. An analysis of how the U.S., Japan, Germany, France and Norway have donated money to climate change … Read More

Can One Polluted Island Help A Drowning Country?

Can One Polluted Island Help A Drowning Country?

Anybody who has made a sandcastle knows that building walls to hold back the ocean is always a losing game. But on an island where the ocean creeps closer every year, it’s a dangerous game people are being forced to play. Kiribati is a country of 33 such islands. With a population of over 100,000 at risk of losing their homes, livelihoods and… Read More

Trying to Save an Endangered Islands’ Cultural Heritage

Trying to Save an Endangered Islands’ Cultural Heritage

Along a pier in San Pedro, Calif., a small fishing community brings in their catch each day, the salty breeze mingling with the smell of fish. This, says Bauea Crosby, is the only place nearby that reminds her of home. Bauea is a high school and community college teacher in nearby Concord. But for her, home is thousands of miles away in the small… Read More

Threat to Salmon Imperils Alaska’s Culture

Threat to Salmon Imperils Alaska’s Culture

Standing chest deep in the cold waters of the Kenai River, I can see salmon skim the surface of the water farther out in the middle of the river. I feel the tug in the big net I hold in the current and run up on shore with the net in tow to pull out the salmon. Glistening on the sand, this fish is one of the many my family will catch this summer… Read More

Stanford Collaboration: Communicating Climate Change

Stanford Collaboration: Communicating Climate Change

Scientists, journalists and editors at Climate Central offered tips, tools, strategies and best practices to Stanford students throughout their “Communicating Climate Change: Navigating stories from the frontlines” course. Climate Central workshops aided students as they developed, researched, interviewed, and wrote climate stories about the human … Read More

Oceans Eating Away at Yet Another Part of Antarctica

Oceans Eating Away at Yet Another Part of Antarctica

The Antarctic Peninsula is one of the fastest warming spots on the planet, and it was thought that the rising air temperature was driving the melt of the glaciers along its fringes. But it is actually warm ocean waters that are eating away at the ice along part of its western side, a group of scientists reported Thursday in the journal Science. The… Read More

Gallery

Winter Precipitation Trends A graphical look at how winter precipitation is trending across the U.S.

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