News Section
Stories from Climate Central's Science Journalists and Content Partners

Hurricanes Boost Carbon Storage in Southeastern Forests

Hurricanes Boost Carbon Storage in Southeastern Forests

Hurricanes hitting the Southeast coast can supercharge the region’s forests, spurring them to store more than 100 times the carbon released annually by all vehicles in the U.S., Duke University researchers have found. Rainfall associated with hurricanes acts as fuel for photosynthesis, drastically increasing trees’ carbon absorption rates… Read More

When the Rains Disappear: Drought Grips Pacific Islands

When the Rains Disappear: Drought Grips Pacific Islands

From the vantage point of a boat bobbing on the deep blue waters of Majuro Lagoon, the encircling shores of the Pacific coral atoll are normally verdant with tropical vegetation. But on a recent sailing excursion with friends, Angela Saunders was struck by how brown and withered the island looked. “The vibrant color of all the trees was gone."… Read More

Coral Deaths Threaten Coasts With Erosion, Flooding

Coral Deaths Threaten Coasts With Erosion, Flooding

Colorful corals draw snorkeling tourists to natural marine playlands along the Florida Keys, Mexican Riviera Maya and northeastern Australia, and new research shows the flailing ecosystems they underpin also protect beachfront hotels from erosion and floods. As coral reefs the world over bleach from warming waters, dissolve from acidification and … Read More

Florida Reefs Are Dissolving Much Sooner Than Expected

Florida Reefs Are Dissolving Much Sooner Than Expected

It wasn’t supposed to happen this fast. Some of the reefs around the Florida Keys are dissolving. They may have crossed a tipping point due to increasing ocean acidification, raising the alarm that climate change impacts in the ocean are continuing to happen at a much quicker pace than scientists previously suspected. Rising carbon dioxide levels … Read More

Paris Pact Could Benefit From Halt of Fossil Fuel Leases

Paris Pact Could Benefit From Halt of Fossil Fuel Leases

Phasing out federal coal, oil and gas leasing on public lands in the U.S. could make a small but significant contribution toward the international goal of keeping global warming to 2°C (3.6°F), according to a paper published Tuesday by the Stockholm Environment Institute. Shutting down all federal oil, gas and coal leasing would lead to a … Read More

Global Warming Is Starving West Coast Waters of Oxygen

Global Warming Is Starving West Coast Waters of Oxygen

Rockfish populations that crashed off the southern Californian coast in the 1990s have been protected by fishing rules and marine parks. But climate change is making a natural threat to the fish even worse. As atmospheric pollution warms the planet and its seas, oxygen levels are declining in the oceans, making it harder for the bottom-dwelling… Read More

Satellite Shows U.S. Has the Most Gas Flares in the World

Satellite Shows U.S. Has the Most Gas Flares in the World

Drive through many oil and gas fields in the U.S. and one thing stands out above the pumpjacks and storage tanks, especially at night — steadily flickering flames. Those flames are known as gas flares, which burn off excess natural gas from crude oil and natural gas wells across the globe. Scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric … Read More

Climate Change is ‘Devastating’ The Great Barrier Reef

Climate Change is ‘Devastating’ The Great Barrier Reef

Warm ocean waters that sucked the color and vigor from sweeping stretches of the world’s greatest expanse of corals last month were driven by climate change, according to a new analysis by scientists, who are warning of worse impacts ahead. Climate change made it 170 times more likely that the surface waters of the Coral Sea, which off the… Read More

Gallery

Boston: July Days Over 90 Degrees By mid-century in Boston, the sweltering heat of July 2010 may be thought of as cooler-than-average conditions

View Gallery