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Pacific Northwest Warming May Have Natural Roots

Pacific Northwest Warming May Have Natural Roots

Dan Nichols was hauling in a gillnet laden with the fruits of a late-season Alaskan salmon run when something heavy flopped out of it, then slid to the front of his boat. “I knew what the tail was,” he says. Surprised, the mustachioed fishing veteran stopped picking salmon from his net and approached the itinerant creature. “I had to stop what I wa… Read More

People’s Climate March Makes Front-Page News

People’s Climate March Makes Front-Page News

When 400,000 people hit the streets, perhaps it isn't surprising that it makes headline news. And that's just what happened on Sunday when the People's Climate March shut down thoroughfares around New York as part of the largest climate action in history. The march drew a wide cross-section of society from public figures like Ban Ki-moon, Al Gore a… Read More

Three Decades Until Carbon Budget Is Eaten Through

Three Decades Until Carbon Budget Is Eaten Through

If the planet’s carbon budget, which is the amount of fuel we can burn, concrete we can produce and forest we can fell without blowing global warming goals, was a giant cake, then we’d all be running out of dessert — fast. We’ve been eating into the carbon budget since the Industrial Revolution. Just nibbling at first, but now with recor… Read More

UN Data on Population Growth is Bad News for Climate

UN Data on Population Growth is Bad News for Climate

The demographers may have got it wrong. New projections say the population of the planet will not stabilize at 9 billion sometime this century. In fact, there is an 80 percent likelihood that, by 2100, it will reach at least 9.6 billion − and maybe rise as high as 12.3 billion. The latest data, published in the U.S. journal Science, has profound an… Read More

Arctic Sea Ice to Reach Sixth Lowest Extent on Record

Arctic Sea Ice to Reach Sixth Lowest Extent on Record

As summer draws to a close, the Arctic sea ice melt season is coming to an end. And while the season didn’t top 2012’s astounding record melt, it has still resulted in what will likely be the sixth lowest September minimum ice extent on record. The extent of the ice on Sept. 15 was 1.96 million square miles, according to the National Snow and Ice D… Read More

The $90 Trillion Climate-Stabilizing Cookbook

The $90 Trillion Climate-Stabilizing Cookbook

We’re baking the world; on track to raise global temperatures by more than 7°F by burning fuels, raising livestock, bulldozing forests, and allowing cities to sprawl as they grow. Pulling the planet out of the costly slow-cooker of old-fashioned traditions in time to avoid the worst of global warming might not be easy. But doing so would make the w… Read More

What Will Survive in Hot, Acidic Oceans?

What Will Survive in Hot, Acidic Oceans?

Marine losers abound in the hustling currents of warming and acidifying oceans. Trying to figure out which types of sea life, particularly those that form calcium carbonate-rich cells and exoskeletons, such as some plankton, corals, and shellfish, will thrive amid climate change can be like playing a high-stakes shell game. New research suggests t… Read More

Tropical Dams an Underestimated Methane Source

Tropical Dams an Underestimated Methane Source

Big dams built in the tropics to produce hydroelectricity have long been highly controversial — data gathered in Laos by a French team studying methane emissions confirms that dams can add to global warming, not reduce it. In many rocky regions low on vegetation and population, such as in Iceland and other northern mountainous regions, the prod… Read More