Support Our Work
News Section
Stories from Climate Central's Science Journalists and Content Partners

Want to Build a Delaware Beach House? Expect Regular Floodwaters in 30 Years

Want to Build a Delaware Beach House? Expect Regular Floodwaters in 30 Years

Southern Delaware Realtor Lee Ann Wilkinson has been helping people achieve their dreams of owning a beach house for more than 30 years. But owning beachfront property in a low-lying and storm-prone state like Delaware comes with flood risks. By the time some of Wilkinson's newer clients pay off their mortgages, their dreams of living on the coast… Read More

Ocean at the Door: New Homes and the Rising Sea

Ocean at the Door: New Homes and the Rising Sea

In 2012, Hurricane Sandy slammed into New Jersey, producing a major storm surge and damaging or destroying many thousands of homes. Over the years that followed, builders put up new houses and reconstructed damaged ones — in many areas that will be vulnerable to more flooding in the future. The post-Sandy rebuilding was a striking example of a… Read More

Rising Tides: How Near-Daily Flooding of America’s Shorelines Could Become the Norm

Rising Tides: How Near-Daily Flooding of America’s Shorelines Could Become the Norm

One morning last October, Miami’s municipal government issued a warning to drivers in the area: they should avoid much of the city’s center, because it had been inundated. “Today, Miami is flooding as if a hurricane went through it,” the city’s mayor wrote on Twitter. No hurricane had hit Miami that week. The flooding was the result of a “king… Read More

Breathing Fire: All This Smoke Means Smaller Newborns And More ER Visits

Breathing Fire: All This Smoke Means Smaller Newborns And More ER Visits

Ask anyone who lived in Washington’s Wenatchee Valley in 2012 about the smoke that year, and they’ll remember. The fires were close and the valley’s dry hillsides trapped the wildfire smoke. It was so bad clinics and drug stores ran out of masks. The air was so choked with smoke that summer camps were canceled and children were kept inside. … Read More

Breathing Fire: Wildfire Smoke Forcing Idahoans Indoors

Breathing Fire: Wildfire Smoke Forcing Idahoans Indoors

Ivy Albert’s job is conversation. Working as an interpreter, she helps the hearing impaired by translating things like doctor’s appointments and business meetings to and from American sign language. She was also born with asthma. Her work requires a lot of talking, something directly impacted by her condition. “When you’re short of breath, it’s … Read More

Breathing Fire: California’s Central Valley Bears the Brunt of Wildfire Smoke

Breathing Fire: California’s Central Valley Bears the Brunt of Wildfire Smoke

After 30 minutes of gardening, Donna Fisher’s eyes are burning. One is swollen shut. Since retiring to the forested foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountain range 20 years ago, the 74-year-old has cultivated a garden large enough to feed her and her husband well into the winter. For the past two years, smoke from wildfires has reduced the time she … Read More

Air Pollution Progress Still Undermined by Western Wildfires

Air Pollution Progress Still Undermined by Western Wildfires

In more than half of the states in the American West, the largest wildfire on record for each state has occurred since 2000. Large wildfires damage landscapes, property, infrastructure, and local economies. They can claim lives directly, and cause or exacerbate serious health problems by releasing significant quantities of air pollutants, including… Read More

West Nile Crippling El Pasoans, Rising Temperatures Play Role

West Nile Crippling El Pasoans, Rising Temperatures Play Role

Elisa Sierra had just given birth to twins when she became infected with West Nile virus. The infection left Sierra, who lives on the West Side of El Paso, Texas, with meningitis and damaged her brain. Sierra is a clinical social worker who used to provide therapy. She’s in a similar line of work following her 2015 illness, but she doesn’t… Read More

Gallery

Changing Rainfall Patterns in the U.S. Since 1900, the average annual precipitation is up 5 percent for the continental U.S.

View Gallery