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Satellites Show Vanuatu’s Scars From Cyclone Pam

Satellites Show Vanuatu’s Scars From Cyclone Pam

Cyclone Pam ripped through the small island nation of Vanuatu earlier this month, leaving behind scenes of utter devastation. Images on the ground have captured ripped up trees, destroyed houses and signs of cleanup underway. Now Landsat satellite images released by NASA Earth Observatory on Friday show the big picture of what those winds, in… Read More

Climate Change on International Disaster Talks Agenda

Climate Change on International Disaster Talks Agenda

It may be nine months until pivotal climate negotiations get underway in Paris, but climate change is very much on the international agenda this week in Sendai, Japan. Countries from the around world have convened there at the behest of the United Nations for the World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction with the goal of updating a 10-year-old ag… Read More

‘Twin’ Cyclones Could Jolt Weak El Nino

‘Twin’ Cyclones Could Jolt Weak El Nino

Weather geeks have been fixated this week on an unusual meteorological phenomenon over the Pacific Ocean: Two tropical cyclones are spinning directly across the equator from each other. But these “twin” cyclones aren’t just a satellite spectacle, they could give a jolt to the weak El Niño that was officially declared by U.S. forecasters last week… Read More

Climate Adaptation Experts Help Prepare for Disaster

Climate Adaptation Experts Help Prepare for Disaster

In 2008, floods in Thailand forced the temporary closure of four Nike factories, costing the company millions of dollars. In 2012, Hurricane Sandy demolished Verizon’s copper-wire infrastructure on the U.S. eastern seaboard, costing thousands of Verizon customers service and the company $1 billion in repair costs. Extreme weather … Read More

NASA Satellites Show Rain In Detail Like Never Before

NASA Satellites Show Rain In Detail Like Never Before

Few things on our planet connect us like precipitation. The storm that drops snow in the mountains of North Carolina one day can bring rain to the plains of Spain a week later. Yet there hasn't been a way to effectively monitor all the precipitation across the globe at once, let alone create a vertical profile from the clouds to the ground. All th… Read More

Climate, Satellite Gaps are Risky Business for Feds

Climate, Satellite Gaps are Risky Business for Feds

In 2014, the federal government set aside $3.5 trillion in outlays for myriad programs. That’s a huge chunk of change exposed to a lot of risks, and according to a new report, two of the biggest threats are the impacts climate change and a looming weather satellite gap. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) released its biennial High Risk rep… Read More

Warmer Seas Linked To East Coast Hurricane Outbreaks

Warmer Seas Linked To East Coast Hurricane Outbreaks

New research shows that hurricane activity picked up along the American East Coast after 1400, following spikes in nearby sea surface temperatures of up to 3.5°F, before waning again late in the 1600s. Researchers who peered into mud to chronicle this and an earlier spike in hurricanes say such storms could become more common again as greenhouse ga… Read More

What If Sandy’s Surge Swamped Washington, D.C.?

What If Sandy’s Surge Swamped Washington, D.C.?

New Yorkers weren’t the only ones shocked and alarmed as Hurricane Sandy pushed a wall of water into the city, funneling the harbor into streets and sending torrents cascading into subways. More than 200 miles to the south, officials in Washington, D.C., were watching and imagining their city in New York’s shoes. Officials with the Metro, jolted by… Read More

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CO2 From Power Plants Visualization of CO2 emissions from U.S. power plants burning fossil fuels.

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