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Alyson Kenward Talks ‘Danger Days’ on WVM Radio

Alyson Kenward Talks ‘Danger Days’ on WVM Radio

Our senior scientist and research director, Alyson Kenward, spoke with West Virginia Morning's Ashton Marra about the high number of "danger days" that West Virginia's capital city, Charleston, will face as the world warms. Climate change is about to make danger days a lot more common over the next 15 years. Charleston, W.Va., for example, is set… Read More

Drought-Fueled Wildfires Burn 7 Million Acres in U.S.

Drought-Fueled Wildfires Burn 7 Million Acres in U.S.

Sap a forest of rain — say, for three or four years — toss in seemingly endless sunshine and high temperatures, and you’ve got just the right recipe for some catastrophic wildfires. Such is the story playing out in the West, where, thanks in part to climate change, drought-fueled infernos are incinerating forests at a record pace from Alaska to … Read More

Surge In ‘Danger Days’ Just Around The Corner

Surge In ‘Danger Days’ Just Around The Corner

Chances are you’ve never heard the phrase “danger day” when it comes to weather. That’s because they’re rare. You’ll want to get to know it, though, because climate change is about to make them a lot more common over the next 15 years. A danger day is when the combination of heat and humidity (also known as the heat index) make it feel like it’s … Read More

Study: Warming May Bring Heightened Salmonella Risk

Study: Warming May Bring Heightened Salmonella Risk

Living along the shoreline may be nice, but a new study suggests that as climate change makes extreme weather and temperature events more frequent, cases of salmonella poisoning may become more prevalent, too, especially in some coastal communities. Each year, it is estimated that 1 million people in the United States become sickened from … Read More

Drought May Stunt Forests’ Ability to Capture Carbon

Drought May Stunt Forests’ Ability to Capture Carbon

Forests are sometimes called the lungs of the earth — they breathe in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and store it in tree trunks until the forest dies or burns. A new study, however, shows that forests devastated by drought may lose their ability to store carbon over a much longer period than previously thought, reducing their role as a buffer … Read More

What Warming Means for 4 of Summer’s Worst Pests

What Warming Means for 4 of Summer’s Worst Pests

Summer may mean it’s time for outdoor fun in the sun, but it’s also prime time for a number of pests. All that extra time outdoors can bring everything from poison ivy rashes to exposure to Lyme disease from tick bites. And of course there’s that ubiquitous summer menace, the mosquito. With the rising temperatures brought about by global warming… Read More

Stagnant Summer Days on the Rise in U.S.

Stagnant Summer Days on the Rise in U.S.

Those long, hot, sultry days of summer, the ones where the air seem so still it wouldn’t disturb a leaf, are also days where air quality can take a nosedive. With winds barely above a whisper and atmosphere-scouring rains nowhere in sight, pollutants can build up in the air we breathe, with potentially serious health consequences. Since climate… Read More

Summer Nights Are Heating Up Across U.S.

Summer Nights Are Heating Up Across U.S.

Global warming often conjures scenes of sweaty, scorching summer days, but daytime temperatures aren’t the only thing expected to rise in a warming world. Nights, too, are expected to get sultrier, with overnight lows not dropping as much as they used to. That trend in increasing nighttime low temperatures is expected to continue for the entire … Read More

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10-Year Anniversary of Hurricane Katrina Ten years ago, Hurricane Katrina became one of the worst natural disasters in U.S. history.

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