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Stories from Climate Central's Science Journalists and Content Partners

Protecting Ag’s Future: Are Seed Banks in Trouble?

Protecting Ag’s Future: Are Seed Banks in Trouble?

During the past few years of civil war in Syria, rebel fighters have destroyed Shia mosques and Christian graves, and burned and looted Christian churches while the Islamic State group has demolished priceless artifacts in the region. Nothing seemed sacred to the disparate groups vying for control of the region. Yet, so far, a store of ancient… Read More

Climate Change Poses a Brewing Problem for Tea

Climate Change Poses a Brewing Problem for Tea

A myth ties the origins of tea to an errant gust of wind that blew tea leaves into a Chinese emperor’s hot water more than 4,700 years ago. Since that lucky first brewing, tea has become the second most popular beverage in the world (behind water, of course). The industry has grown into a $20 billion behemoth that sells everything from pedestrian … Read More

Drought Takes $2.7 Billion Toll on California Agriculture

Drought Takes $2.7 Billion Toll on California Agriculture

The record-breaking drought in California — brought about by a severe lack of precipitation, especially mountain snows — has exacted a $2.7 billion toll on the state’s economy because of agricultural losses, researchers said Tuesday. During a briefing for the California Department of Food & Agriculture, scientists from the University of California … Read More

Vietnam’s Coffee Crops Suffer Rising Temps and Drought

Vietnam’s Coffee Crops Suffer Rising Temps and Drought

The last time Nguyen Van Viet saw water in his well was almost four months ago. The 44-year-old has farmed coffee in central Vietnam for two decades and says that’s never happened before. “This is the worst drought I’ve seen in over a decade,” Viet, told the Guardian. “Some people don’t have enough water to drink.” For Viet and millions of other … Read More

The Quest to Quench the World’s Thirst for Water

The Quest to Quench the World’s Thirst for Water

As climate change makes rainfall less predictable and droughts more common, a growing number of countries are turning to desalination. The term is used to refer to removing salt from both seawater and subterranean “brackish” water, as well as the treatment of waste water (aka sewerage) to make it drinkable. Some environmentalists have long opposed … Read More

El Niño Could Bring Drought and Famine in West Africa

El Niño Could Bring Drought and Famine in West Africa

A global weather phenomenon could cause a famine in the Sahel this year by combining with already dry conditions to create a “double whammy” for the region, scientists and aid groups have warned. Professor Adam Scaife, a long term forecaster at the UK Met Office Hadley Centre, said models now agreed an El Niño event was likely and the first impact… Read More

Arctic Ice Melting Faster and Earlier With Dire Results

Arctic Ice Melting Faster and Earlier With Dire Results

There was less ice in the Arctic this winter than in any other winter during the satellite era, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientists said on Tuesday. The announcement was consistent with previous predictions that the Arctic would have entirely ice-free summers by 2040, they said in a briefing to the media on the state of clima… Read More

Climate Change Will Greatly Impact Australians’ Health

Climate Change Will Greatly Impact Australians’ Health

Climate change will have significant repercussions for Australians’ health as warming temperatures fuel extreme weather events, help spread disease and disrupt food and water supplies, according to a report backed by the country’s peak scientific and medical bodies. The report, released by the Australian Academy of Science, warns that vulnerable… Read More

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Summer Precipitation Trends The wet are getting wetter and the dry are getting drier.

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