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Warmer Indian Ocean Could Be ‘Ecological Desert’

Warmer Indian Ocean Could Be ‘Ecological Desert’

Anslem Silva has fished for four decades from this popular harbor on Sri Lanka's west coast, but for five years now filling his boat has become increasingly difficult. "We seem to be spending more and more time out at sea looking for catch. Where there were fish for decades, now there is very little. It is strange, but all of us have been noticing… Read More

Gulf of Maine Fishermen Face Warming ‘Double Whammy’

Gulf of Maine Fishermen Face Warming ‘Double Whammy’

After David Goethel set out on his 44-foot trawler on a calm New England day last week, he caught a third of his cod quota for the year in about 10 minutes. In 2010, Goethel was allowed to land about 60,000 pounds of cod. This year, following a population crash linked to warming waters, his limit was set at a meager 3,700 pounds. Oceans are … Read More

2016: What to Look for in Energy and Climate

2016: What to Look for in Energy and Climate

2016 will kick off with a sense of optimism about climate change after the success of the Paris climate talks in December. In the U.S., that may mean more enthusiasm for commitments to renewables and other lower-carbon energy sources as low oil prices make the future of fossil fuels production in the U.S. and Canada less certain.… Read More

Earth Has Lost a Third of Arable Land in Past 40 Years

Earth Has Lost a Third of Arable Land in Past 40 Years

The world has lost a third of its arable land due to erosion or pollution in the past 40 years, with potentially disastrous consequences as global demand for food soars, scientists have warned. New research has calculated that nearly 33 percent of the world’s adequate or high-quality food-producing land has been lost at a rate that far outstrips… Read More

Decline of Tropical Animals Could Hasten Climate Change

Decline of Tropical Animals Could Hasten Climate Change

As go toucans, spider monkeys and tapirs, so goes the climate. Put another way, the hunting and poaching of tropical animals could change the face of rainforests such as the Amazon, diminishing their ability to store global carbon dioxide emissions by up to 20 percent. Those are the findings of research published Friday by a team of scientists… Read More

Paris Climate Pact Could Leave Forests Vulnerable

Paris Climate Pact Could Leave Forests Vulnerable

Efforts to foster forests and slow deforestation, which is one of the leading causes of global warming, are largely being glossed over by most nations as they prepare for a historic round of climate negotiations. It remains unclear whether any agreement struck during the upcoming U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change session, which begins in … Read More

50 Years After Warning, No Debate in Paris on the Science

50 Years After Warning, No Debate in Paris on the Science

Diplomats steeling themselves for a historic round of United Nations climate negotiations remain divided by a handful of stubborn disputes. Discord persists over financial and procedural issues, for example, and over how pollution from farming and deforestation should be addressed alongside energy generation. The fundamentals of climate science … Read More

Paris Agreement Could Put Leash Around Global Warming

Paris Agreement Could Put Leash Around Global Warming

The United Nations released its analysis of climate pledges, showing that the global populace is beginning to pursue a rich medley of approaches for stemming warming — and for adapting to it. Those approaches include putting caps and prices on carbon dioxide pollution, slowing deforestation, and reforming farming practices. Developing countries … Read More

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Severe Weather Season Severe weather climatology expanding and contracting across the U.S.

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