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Celebrate NASA Satellite’s Birthday With 5 Amazing Pics

Celebrate NASA Satellite’s Birthday With 5 Amazing Pics

From shrinking glaciers in Antarctica to the rise of irrigation in Kansas to really ridiculously good looking clouds, the Landsat series of satellites have been continuously capturing amazing Earth imagery since this day in 1972. There have been eight Landsat satellites sent into space by NASA and operated in cooperation with the U.S. Geological S… Read More

As Arctic Ice Melts, Polar Bears Find a New Menu

As Arctic Ice Melts, Polar Bears Find a New Menu

Starving polar bears, icon of the climate change movement, may be able to adapt to an ice-free summer season in the Arctic after all. Scientists have long thought that polar bears essentially starve during the summer, living off fat reserves until the sea ice returns and they can venture out to sea to capture their main source of calories: seals. B… Read More

Genes Help Plants Handle Rising CO2 Levels

Genes Help Plants Handle Rising CO2 Levels

Biologists in the U.S. have identified the genetic machinery that tells a plant how to respond to more carbon dioxide caused by the burning of fossil fuels. Four genes from three different gene families together control the density of stomata, or breathing pores, on the foliage of the healthy plant. As carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere rise, … Read More

Measuring Cow & Pig Emissions Goes to New Heights

Measuring Cow & Pig Emissions Goes to New Heights

Methane emissions from cows and pigs had a greater impact on climate change than oil and gas production a decade ago, and livestock emitted more methane than previously expected, according to a new Harvard University study — the first to use high-resolution satellite data to study methane emissions in the U.S.… Read More

Deforestation Rate in Indonesia Surpasses Brazil

Deforestation Rate in Indonesia Surpasses Brazil

the government's former head of forestry data gathering. UN and official government figures have maintained that the country with the third biggest stretch of tropical forest after the Amazon and Congo was losing 310,000 hectares (766,000 acres) of all its forest a year between 2000 and 2005, increasing to 690,000 hectares (1.7 million acres) annu… Read More

Warming Puts Emperor Penguins at Risk of Extinction

Warming Puts Emperor Penguins at Risk of Extinction

The entire population of Antarctica's famous emperor penguins could fall by a third by the end of the century because of disappearing sea ice, putting them at risk of extinction, researchers said on Sunday. The finding justified protecting emperor penguins under the endangered species act – as America already does for polar bear – the researchers … Read More

Taking a Bite Out of Climate: 4 World Cup Snacks

Taking a Bite Out of Climate: 4 World Cup Snacks

Remember how your mother put ants on a log to get you excited about eating a healthy snack? Do your mom proud by replacing those raisins with actual ants for your World Cup snacking. Insects are naturally packed with protein and omega fatty acids so you can binge without the guilt of potato chips. But bug’s aren’t just a personal health issue. Rai… Read More

Uncivil War Brews Over Summer Flounder as Waters Warm

Uncivil War Brews Over Summer Flounder as Waters Warm

The summer flounder – one of the most sought-after catches on the U.S. East Coast – is stirring up a climate change battle as it glides through the sand and grasses at the bottom of a warming North Atlantic. Also known as "fluke," the flat, toothy fish is remarkable for its ability to change color to adapt to its surroundings, rendering it almost i… Read More