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Atlantic Circulation Weaker Than In Last Thousand Years

Atlantic Circulation Weaker Than In Last Thousand Years

Powerful Atlantic Ocean currents fuel Gulf streams, affect sea levels, warm cities in continental Europe and North America, and bring nutrients up from ocean depths that help sustain marine ecosystems and fisheries. But an avalanche of cold water from the melting Greenland ice sheet appears to be slowing the ocean circulation to levels not experie… Read More

Drought-Stricken West Gives Rise to Old World Cows

Drought-Stricken West Gives Rise to Old World Cows

In the remote reaches of Mexico’s Copper Canyon, miles from the nearest road or settlement, a moving speck on a steep rock wall caught Alfredo Gonzalez’s eye. “I thought, that couldn’t be a cow, maybe a goat,” the longtime ranch manager and animal scientist. “The canyon goes straight up and down. But when we looked with binoculars, there they were:… Read More

Here’s Where Ocean Acidification Will Hit the U.S. Hardest

Here’s Where Ocean Acidification Will Hit the U.S. Hardest

U.S. coastal communities better start preparing for ocean acidification now, especially if we want scallops, oysters and other shellfish to keep appearing on our dinnerplates. That’s the message of a new study that shows that shellfisheries across the U.S. are more vulnerable to climate change’s less considered counterpart than previously thought … Read More

Can Grains of the Past Help Us Weather Future Storms?

Can Grains of the Past Help Us Weather Future Storms?

In May 2009, Cyclone Aila wreaked havoc in eastern India. Clocking in at speeds of over 120 kilometers per hour, Aila hit the Sundarbans, the largest continuous block of mangrove forest in the world, located in the Ganga-Brahmaputra tidal delta on the Bay of Bengal. The storm killed hundreds of people and livestock, damaged close to a million… Read More

Climate, Satellite Gaps are Risky Business for Feds

Climate, Satellite Gaps are Risky Business for Feds

In 2014, the federal government set aside $3.5 trillion in outlays for myriad programs. That’s a huge chunk of change exposed to a lot of risks, and according to a new report, two of the biggest threats are the impacts climate change and a looming weather satellite gap. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) released its biennial High Risk rep… Read More

Is pH a Red Herring for Ocean Acidification?

Is pH a Red Herring for Ocean Acidification?

In 2007, the owners of Whiskey Creek oyster hatchery on the Oregon coast lost almost all of their larvae — and had no idea why. The only clue was that the larval die-offs often occurred during intense upwelling events, when deep, acidic waters replace surface waters blown offshore. The next year, the hatchery owners turned to Burke Hales, a … Read More

Farming Now Worse For Climate Than Deforestation

Farming Now Worse For Climate Than Deforestation

A new study describes how this trend has seen agriculture overtake deforestation as the leading source of land-based greenhouse gas pollution during the past decade. While United Nations climate negotiations focus heavily on forest protections, the researchers note that delegates to the talks ignore similar opportunities to reform farming.… Read More

Climate Change Mitigation’s Best-Kept Secret

Climate Change Mitigation’s Best-Kept Secret

At Blue Spruce Farm in Bridport, Vt., the black-and-white dairy cows are used to the routine. In what looks like a choreographed dance, 1,400 milk cows delicately step over the scrapers that run along the concrete floors and collect their manure, which goes into a huge digester capable of holding 21 days’ worth of waste. Inside, highly flammable… Read More

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Top 10 Weather and Climate Events of 2012 Our list of the top 10 extreme weather and climate events of 2012

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