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Summer Sea Ice Likely to Drop to 4th Lowest on Record

Summer Sea Ice Likely to Drop to 4th Lowest on Record

The shell of ice that covers the Arctic Ocean is nearing its yearly low point, and projections suggest that it will be among the four lowest summer minimums on record. If melt rates are speedy enough, there’s a small chance it could even take the number two spot, forecasters said Wednesday, as the ice continues its decades-long, warming-driven… Read More

U.S. Seeks Greater Focus on Ocean Warming

U.S. Seeks Greater Focus on Ocean Warming

The U.S. government has urged the international community to focus more on the impact of climate change on the oceans, amid growing concern over changes affecting corals, shellfish and other marine life. The U.S. will raise the issue at United Nations climate talks in Paris later this year. The UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)… Read More

Climate Change Poses Risk to Great Barrier Reef Species

Climate Change Poses Risk to Great Barrier Reef Species

Species native to the Great Barrier Reef are more likely to face extinction through climate change than marine life elsewhere that can adapt by “invading” new regions, according to new research. The largest study to date on the impacts of climate change on marine biodiversity found that many species would cope by finding new waters. However,… Read More

Wildfires Are Ruining the National Park Service’s Birthday

Wildfires Are Ruining the National Park Service’s Birthday

In honor of the agency’s 99th birthday, the National Park Service is offering free entrance to its 58 parks and 350 other sites. In the Pacific Northwest and Northern Rockies, park visitors might also be hoping that entry comes with a free respirator and x-ray vision. Smoke from large wildfires is obscuring some of the stunning vistas that inspired… Read More

Drought-Fueled Wildfires Burn 7 Million Acres in U.S.

Drought-Fueled Wildfires Burn 7 Million Acres in U.S.

Sap a forest of rain — say, for three or four years — toss in seemingly endless sunshine and high temperatures, and you’ve got just the right recipe for some catastrophic wildfires. Such is the story playing out in the West, where, thanks in part to climate change, drought-fueled infernos are incinerating forests at a record pace from Alaska to … Read More

Drought May Stunt Forests’ Ability to Capture Carbon

Drought May Stunt Forests’ Ability to Capture Carbon

Forests are sometimes called the lungs of the earth — they breathe in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and store it in tree trunks until the forest dies or burns. A new study, however, shows that forests devastated by drought may lose their ability to store carbon over a much longer period than previously thought, reducing their role as a buffer … Read More

What Warming Means for 4 of Summer’s Worst Pests

What Warming Means for 4 of Summer’s Worst Pests

Summer may mean it’s time for outdoor fun in the sun, but it’s also prime time for a number of pests. All that extra time outdoors can bring everything from poison ivy rashes to exposure to Lyme disease from tick bites. And of course there’s that ubiquitous summer menace, the mosquito. With the rising temperatures brought about by global warming… Read More

Rising Sea Levels Could Decimate Sea Turtle Nests

Rising Sea Levels Could Decimate Sea Turtle Nests

Rising sea levels could decimate sea turtle nesting sites around the world, scientists have warned, with the largest rookery site for green turtles increasingly at risk from being swamped by seawater. Researchers have tested the impact of seawater upon turtle eggs in an attempt to find out why so few hatchlings were emerging on Raine Island.… Read More

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A Seasonal & Regional Tornado Breakdown The probability of a tornado touchdown somewhere in the U.S. jumps to nearly 80% in May.

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