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Wildfires Tied to Drought, Heat & Topography, Not Beetles

Wildfires Tied to Drought, Heat & Topography, Not Beetles

Climate change-driven drought and higher temperatures are among the biggest factors, in addition to topography, influencing wildfire spread in the West, according to a new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.… Read More

Atlantic Circulation Weaker Than In Last Thousand Years

Atlantic Circulation Weaker Than In Last Thousand Years

Powerful Atlantic Ocean currents fuel Gulf streams, affect sea levels, warm cities in continental Europe and North America, and bring nutrients up from ocean depths that help sustain marine ecosystems and fisheries. But an avalanche of cold water from the melting Greenland ice sheet appears to be slowing the ocean circulation to levels not experie… Read More

Amazon Trees Removed Almost a Third Less Carbon

Amazon Trees Removed Almost a Third Less Carbon

The amount of carbon the Amazon’s remaining trees removed from the atmosphere fell by almost a third last decade, leading scientists to warn that manmade carbon emissions would need to be cut more deeply to tackle climate change. Trees in untouched areas of the forest have been dying off across the basin at an increasing rate, found the study, publ… Read More

Deforestation Slowing, But Forests Are Breaking Down

Deforestation Slowing, But Forests Are Breaking Down

The amount of climate pollution being produced every year by the felling of forests is falling worldwide, but benefits of the heartening decline are being eroded by the worsening conditions of the forests still left standing. The losses of entire stretches of forests, combined with losses of individual trees from forests that remain, pumped an ave… Read More

Drought-Stricken West Gives Rise to Old World Cows

Drought-Stricken West Gives Rise to Old World Cows

In the remote reaches of Mexico’s Copper Canyon, miles from the nearest road or settlement, a moving speck on a steep rock wall caught Alfredo Gonzalez’s eye. “I thought, that couldn’t be a cow, maybe a goat,” the longtime ranch manager and animal scientist. “The canyon goes straight up and down. But when we looked with binoculars, there they were:… Read More

Southern California’s Fog Falls Victim to Concrete

Southern California’s Fog Falls Victim to Concrete

Summertime fog that helps keep coastal southern California cool and damp appears to be melting away, and scientists who have documented nearly 70 years of its decline think they can explain why: concrete. The urban heat island effect, the phenomenon of cities warming faster than surrounding countryside, is a main culprit for a two-thirds reduction… Read More

Public Lands May Be America’s Best Climate Defense

Public Lands May Be America’s Best Climate Defense

Public lands protect forests that help store atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions while providing space for renewable energy development and protecting wildlife habitat and biodiversity, helping plants and animals adapt to climate change.… Read More

CO2 Boosts Trees, But Ups Damage From Forest Pests

CO2 Boosts Trees, But Ups Damage From Forest Pests

Scientists warn that damage inflicted by tiny forest pests could worsen as carbon dioxide levels rise. Early research suggests that attacks by caterpillars, beetles, termites and other insects in some forests could be enough to cancel out projected increases in tree growth rates. Forests are critical sponges for sucking carbon dioxide out of the ai… Read More

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CO2 Injection CO2 captured from coal-fired electric power plants may be injected for storage into porous layers of rock and sand

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