News Section
  • News
  • Flora & Fauna
Stories from Climate Central's Science Journalists and Content Partners

Drying Amazon Could Be Major Carbon Concern

Drying Amazon Could Be Major Carbon Concern

The lungs of the planet are drying out, threatening to cause Earth to cough up some of its carbon reserves. The Amazon rainforest inhales massive amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, helping keep the globe’s carbon budget in balance (at least until human emissions started throwing that balance off). But since 2000, drier conditions are ca… Read More

From Grid Waste to Good Taste

From Grid Waste to Good Taste

The U.S. power grid is a vital part of the nation’s infrastructure. It’s also a wasteful one. Nearly two-thirds of every megawatt U.S. power plants produce never does a bit of useful work. Some of it is lost due to the natural resistance of power lines. Some is lost as heat during generation. And, perhaps surprisingly, some is lost by design when u… Read More

To Shrink a Goat, Warm the Globe

To Shrink a Goat, Warm the Globe

If a young Italian goat magically joined Alice in a climate-changed Wonderland, new research suggests it would skip the fattening cake and suckle instead at the body-shrinking potion. As global warming’s grip strengthens around the Italian Alps’ already-diminutive chamois — as the goat-antelope species that was studied is known — temperature rise … Read More

Climate Change Takes Center Stage on Instagram

Climate Change Takes Center Stage on Instagram

Odorless, invisible gases cause the buildup of heat in the Earth’s atmosphere and oceans that lead to climate change. Those changes, such as shifts in rainfall patterns and the acidification of sea waters, are ones that happen in the long-term, relegating them to the background and making them hard to notice. The International Center for Photograph… Read More

Warming Endangers a Crucial Yellowstone Tree

Warming Endangers a Crucial Yellowstone Tree

If you've hiked in the Northern Rockies above 9,000 feet, you've hiked among a whitebark pine forest. And if you've hiked in the Rockies since 2009, you've likely hiked through a dead and dying forest, felled by a widespread outbreak of the mountain pine beetle. At a scientific conference Tuesday at Mammoth Hot Springs, near Yellowstone's northern … Read More

Fish Fail to Adapt to Rising CO2 Levels: Study

Fish Fail to Adapt to Rising CO2 Levels: Study

Rising carbon dioxide levels in oceans adversely change the behavior of fish through generations, raising the possibility that marine species may never fully adapt to their changed environment, research has found. The study, published in Nature Climate Change, found that elevated CO2 levels affected fish regardless of whether their parents had also… Read More

How We Can Save Coral Reefs and Why We Should

How We Can Save Coral Reefs and Why We Should

Coral reefs are among the most beautiful ecosystems on Earth — “a jeweled belt around the middle of the planet,” in oceanographer Sylvia Earle’s words. They also are extremely valuable. Reefs cover less than one-tenth of 1 percent of the ocean floor but support more than 800 species of coral and 4,000 species of fish. They are spawning grounds, coa… Read More

Drought Takes Hold as Amazon’s ‘Flying Rivers’ Dry Up

Drought Takes Hold as Amazon’s ‘Flying Rivers’ Dry Up

The unprecedented drought now affecting São Paulo, South America’s giant metropolis, is believed to be caused by the absence of the “flying rivers” − the vapor clouds from the Amazon that normally bring rain to the center and south of Brazil. Some Brazilian scientists say the absence of rain that has dried up rivers and reservoirs in central and so… Read More