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Stories from Climate Central's Science Journalists and Content Partners

For the West, A Winter That Has Felt More Like Spring

For the West, A Winter That Has Felt More Like Spring

From San Diego to Seattle, February has looked — and felt — a lot more like April. Flowers that normally wouldn’t start to bud until well into spring have already started to blossom and grow. Residents have been walking around in t-shirts and shorts, a rarity even for Southern California winters. “Winter has seemed to have completely forgotten… Read More

Here’s Where Ocean Acidification Will Hit the U.S. Hardest

Here’s Where Ocean Acidification Will Hit the U.S. Hardest

U.S. coastal communities better start preparing for ocean acidification now, especially if we want scallops, oysters and other shellfish to keep appearing on our dinnerplates. That’s the message of a new study that shows that shellfisheries across the U.S. are more vulnerable to climate change’s less considered counterpart than previously thought … Read More

Last Tango for Nuclear?

Last Tango for Nuclear?

Everybody loves a comeback story. If you like the U.S. nuclear power industry, it’s a Michael Jordan-type gallant return. If you don’t like nukes, it’s more of a Gloria Swanson gruesome comeback in Sunset Boulevard. Similar to both Jordan and Swanson’s character, Norma Desmond, the industry has tried more than one revival. The current one may be m… Read More

Warmer Oceans Helping Coral-Eating Starfish Thrive

Warmer Oceans Helping Coral-Eating Starfish Thrive

Warmer seas are creating an additional threat to the Great Barrier Reef, with new research suggesting rising temperatures are helping a key coral predator thrive. Crown-of-thorns starfish that eat coral are more likely to survive with rising sea surface heat levels, according to a study by the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS). An … Read More

Is pH a Red Herring for Ocean Acidification?

Is pH a Red Herring for Ocean Acidification?

In 2007, the owners of Whiskey Creek oyster hatchery on the Oregon coast lost almost all of their larvae — and had no idea why. The only clue was that the larval die-offs often occurred during intense upwelling events, when deep, acidic waters replace surface waters blown offshore. The next year, the hatchery owners turned to Burke Hales, a … Read More

Climate Change Mitigation’s Best-Kept Secret

Climate Change Mitigation’s Best-Kept Secret

At Blue Spruce Farm in Bridport, Vt., the black-and-white dairy cows are used to the routine. In what looks like a choreographed dance, 1,400 milk cows delicately step over the scrapers that run along the concrete floors and collect their manure, which goes into a huge digester capable of holding 21 days’ worth of waste. Inside, highly flammable… Read More

NASA’s $1 Billion Soil Moisture Mission Ready For Lift Off

NASA’s $1 Billion Soil Moisture Mission Ready For Lift Off

NASA is spending nearly $1 billion on a new satellite, scheduled to be blasted into space over the weekend, following nearly a decade of work and two launch delays, that will help scientists measure moisture levels in the top two inches of the world’s soils. A couple inches of loam or humus could sound like much ado about nothing. But to the earth… Read More

Scientists Find Which Coral Reefs Will Survive Warming

Scientists Find Which Coral Reefs Will Survive Warming

Scientists have identified which parts of the Great Barrier Reef and other reefs are most capable of recovering from mass bleaching events which will become more frequent due to global warming. The information should help conservationists to target their efforts to protect the portions of reefs that are most capable of survival, they say. Previous … Read More