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Stories from Climate Central's Science Journalists and Content Partners

A Computer Just Changed the Coral Research Game

A Computer Just Changed the Coral Research Game

Coral reefs are increasingly imperiled by global warming. Rising temperatures and ocean acidification are destroying some of the world’s most stunning ecosystems. That’s why scientists’ efforts to save them have been going into overdrive recently, working in labs and in the field to find out what makes some corals more resilient than others. The … Read More

Wind at China’s Back to Amp Up Its Renewables

Wind at China’s Back to Amp Up Its Renewables

China can tap just 10 percent of its wind resources to supply more than a quarter of its electricity by 2030, significantly boosting the global transition to renewable energy, according to an MIT study.… Read More

Global Coral Bleaching Continues For a Record Third Year

Global Coral Bleaching Continues For a Record Third Year

Bad coral reef news seems to be never-ending these days. Case in point: on Monday, scientists announced that the world is in for an unprecedented third year of coral bleaching across the globe. The announcement comes courtesy of NOAA Coral Reef Watch, which keeps an eye on a number of climate factors that can stress reefs out. That includes rising… Read More

This Mammal Has Been Wiped Out Due to Climate Change

This Mammal Has Been Wiped Out Due to Climate Change

Human-caused climate change appears to have driven the Great Barrier Reef’s only endemic mammal species into the history books, with the Bramble Cay melomys, a small rodent that lives on a tiny island in the eastern Torres Strait, being completely wiped-out from its only known location. It is also the first recorded extinction of a mammal anywhere… Read More

Rodent Threat Defeated As Delmarva Battles Rising Seas

Rodent Threat Defeated As Delmarva Battles Rising Seas

A rodent resembling a rat was found dead in a trap on a warm day last spring in marshland popular with hunters and fishers. It was the last time anybody saw a nutria on the Delmarva Peninsula. A $1 million-a-year federal program that has killed 13,000 of the wetland-destroying pests on the peninsula since 2003 has failed to capture or detect signs… Read More

Fishing For Bright Spots in a World of Sick Reefs

Fishing For Bright Spots in a World of Sick Reefs

An unprecedented ecological analysis of fish survey findings from more than 2,500 reefs worldwide revealed on Wednesday that Muluk villagers of Karkar Island do better jobs than almost anybody in the West of managing fish stocks for the long term bounties they can provide. Karkar Island showed up as one of 15 “bright spots” in the analysis … Read More

A Simple Idea Could Help Wildlife Survive Climate Change

A Simple Idea Could Help Wildlife Survive Climate Change

Global warming is chasing plants and animals, forcing them to head uphill or north to find suitable habitat. Scientists have considered migration corridors — restored, healthy natural areas that connect current habitats with likely landing spots — as a way to help plants and animals stay a step ahead of climate change. New findings published on … Read More

Bay Area Voters Approve Tax to Fix Marshes As Seas Rise

Bay Area Voters Approve Tax to Fix Marshes As Seas Rise

Voters in the San Francisco Bay Area approved an unprecedented tax Tuesday to help fund an ambitious vision for restoring lost marshlands, handing electoral victory to shorebirds, crabs and advocates of a muddy strategy for adapting to rising seas. Measure AA is projected to raise an estimated $25 million a year for 20 years. As of Wednesday … Read More

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Decades of Warming Despite the recent slowdown in warming rate, this past decade was the world's warmest on record.

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