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Rain, Storm Surge Combine to Put U.S. Coasts at Risk

Rain, Storm Surge Combine to Put U.S. Coasts at Risk

After the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, New Orleanians thought they knew what areas were susceptible to flooding during a storm. So when Hurricane Isaac, a much weaker storm than Katrina, bore down on the city in 2012, those who live to the west of Lake Pontchartrain weren’t worried, as they had been spared the raging waters that inundated so… Read More

GAO Report Sees Climate Risks to Army Corps Projects

GAO Report Sees Climate Risks to Army Corps Projects

Thousands of dams, levees, hurricane barriers and flood walls built across the country by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers may be at risk from extreme weather and sea level rise driven by climate change, but the Army Corps has only just begun to assess how vulnerable they are and suffers from a lack of funding, according to a U.S. Government … Read More

How This El Niño Is And Isn’t Like 1997

How This El Niño Is And Isn’t Like 1997

It was the winter of 1997-1998 when the granddaddy of El Niños — the one by which all other El Niños are judged — vaulted the climate term to household name status. It had such a noticeable impact on U.S. weather that it appeared everywhere from news coverage of mudslides in Southern California to Chris Farley’s legendary skit on “Saturday Night… Read More

Dire Climate Warning Raises Questions, Not Answers

Dire Climate Warning Raises Questions, Not Answers

NASA’s former climate chief has issued a stark new study that finds that the world’s current climate goal could be inadequate and may not prevent catastrophic losses from rising seas, ocean temperatures and changes in global weather. But the extreme nature of his projections has some scientists questioning the methods he used and the results … Read More

Warming Waters Fueled Intense Russian Rainstorm

Warming Waters Fueled Intense Russian Rainstorm

The torrential rains that fell on the coastal Black Sea town of Krymsk, Russia, in July 2012 shouldn’t have been possible. In the historical records, there is nothing like the 6.7 inches of rain that fell in the area in less than a day, causing catastrophic flash floods that led to the deaths of more than 170 people. One team of scientists says… Read More

Study Suggests Key Role for Warming in Extreme Weather

Study Suggests Key Role for Warming in Extreme Weather

When massive storms inundate coastlines or a veritable snowpocalypse keeps a city buried for days, the first question on many minds is: Was climate change to blame? It may play more of a role than previous studies have suggested, according to scientists who advocate a different approach to searching for the fingerprints of warming in extreme … Read More

Twitter Could Shape Flood Disaster Response

Twitter Could Shape Flood Disaster Response

First the rains came. Then the floods. Then the tweets. In late January 2014, Jakarta was inundated with heavy rain. So much rain fell that the region saw 16 inches more rainfall than normal for the month. Rivers rose and punctured their banks, spilling onto the streets of the Indonesian capital. Flood waters reached over 6 feet in some areas and … Read More

What Bill’s Downpours Tell Us About Texas’ Future

What Bill’s Downpours Tell Us About Texas’ Future

Tropical Storm Bill is smashing into the Texas coast, bringing with it storm surge, high winds and, most worryingly, potentially very heavy rains. Eastern Texas is already waterlogged after record-breaking May rainfall, and is expected to see another 4 to 8 inches (and possibly localized spots up to 12 inches), setting up the likelihood of… Read More

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Atlantic Hurricane Season Did you know...? The peak of hurricane & tropical storm activity doesn’t usually come until Sept. 10.

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