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The $9.7 Trillion Problem: Cyclones and Climate Change

The $9.7 Trillion Problem: Cyclones and Climate Change

You can do a lot with $9.7 trillion: buy all the real estate in Manhattan 12 times over, purchase 22 carbon copies of Apple, or an absurd quantity of apples. It’s also the amount of money that tropical cyclones could cost the global economy over the next century, especially if climate projections of fewer but more intense cyclones are accurate. In… Read More

Where Is El Nino? And Why Do We Care?

Where Is El Nino? And Why Do We Care?

But the reason we still care so much about it, following all of its tiny fluctuations toward becoming a full-blown El Niño, is that it can have important effects on the world’s weather, including in the U.S. It can even boost global temperatures, helping set the planet on the course to be the warmest year on record.… Read More

2014 Extreme Weather: Looking for Climate Ties

2014 Extreme Weather: Looking for Climate Ties

The ongoing, intense drought in California; the nonstop storms that left parts of Great Britain waterlogged all winter; the bitter winter cold in the eastern U.S. — these are just some of the extreme weather events from this year that could be examined in an annual report that looks for the fingerprints of climate change in such occurrences. … Read More

Sea Level Rise Making Floods Routine for Coastal Cities

Sea Level Rise Making Floods Routine for Coastal Cities

Coastal American cities are sinking into saturated new realities, new analysis has confirmed. Sea level rise has given a boost to high tides, which are regularly overtopping streets, floorboards and other low-lying areas that had long existed in relatively dehydrated harmony with nearby waterfronts — a trend projected to worsen sharply in the comin… Read More

Drought Dries Up California Hydropower

Drought Dries Up California Hydropower

There’s so little water available in California's reservoirs that its ability to produce hydropower has been cut in half, while its use of renewables and natural gas power has spiked, a U.S. Energy Information Administration report published Monday shows.… Read More

World’s First Carbon Capture Power Plant Switches On

World’s First Carbon Capture Power Plant Switches On

Canada has switched on the first large-scale coal-fired power plant fitted with a technology that proponents say enables the burning of fossil fuels without tipping the world into a climate catastrophe. The project, the first commercial-scale plant equipped with carbon capture and storage technology, was held up by the coal industry as a real life … Read More

How We Can Save Coral Reefs and Why We Should

How We Can Save Coral Reefs and Why We Should

Coral reefs are among the most beautiful ecosystems on Earth — “a jeweled belt around the middle of the planet,” in oceanographer Sylvia Earle’s words. They also are extremely valuable. Reefs cover less than one-tenth of 1 percent of the ocean floor but support more than 800 species of coral and 4,000 species of fish. They are spawning grounds, coa… Read More

Picture This: Fall Snow and Bizarre Clouds Over NYC

Picture This: Fall Snow and Bizarre Clouds Over NYC

The signs of fall continue to flourish, but the weather isn't all clear skies. Some intimidating clouds rolled over New York City early in the week, just as the first snows of the season fell on some of Colorado's peaks. Across the pond, torrential rains flooded a city in southern France, while in the Pacific, yet another typhoon took aim at Japan.… Read More