News Section
Stories from Climate Central's Science Journalists and Content Partners

El Niño Could Bring Drought and Famine in West Africa

El Niño Could Bring Drought and Famine in West Africa

A global weather phenomenon could cause a famine in the Sahel this year by combining with already dry conditions to create a “double whammy” for the region, scientists and aid groups have warned. Professor Adam Scaife, a long term forecaster at the UK Met Office Hadley Centre, said models now agreed an El Niño event was likely and the first impact… Read More

Moderately Cold Temps ‘More Deadly Than Heat Waves’

Moderately Cold Temps ‘More Deadly Than Heat Waves’

Heat waves are not as deadly as has been assumed, according to research that suggests prolonged exposure to moderately cold temperatures kills more people than scorching or freezing spells. The study of deaths in 13 countries, published in the Lancet medical journal, found that cold weather kills 20 times as many people as hot weather, and that … Read More

Monsoon Sets Up ‘Race Against the Clock’ in Nepal

Monsoon Sets Up ‘Race Against the Clock’ in Nepal

The prospect of aftershocks continue to keep Nepal on edge after a major earthquake shook the country in late April. The magnitude 7.8 earthquake and its aftershocks have left an estimated 500,000 families homeless, more than 8,000 dead and scarred the country with at least 3,000 landslides. But another issue for quake-rattled Nepal is brewing … Read More

Texas, Oklahoma Drought ‘All But Over’

Texas, Oklahoma Drought ‘All But Over’

While the Western drought has its claws firmly dug in, the nearly five-year drought that has gripped Oklahoma and Texas is on its last legs, thanks to recent torrents of rain, government climate scientists said Thursday. “I think the Texas drought is pretty much all but over,” Victor Murphy, climate services program manager for the National Weather… Read More

Past 12 Months Tied for Warmest on Record

Past 12 Months Tied for Warmest on Record

April capped a 12-month period that tied the warmest such stretch on record, according to data released Tuesday. That period, going back to May 2014, tied the previous record holder, the 12 months from April 2014 to March 2015. Of the 10 warmest 12-month periods on record, nine occurred in the past two years, most of them in back-to-back… Read More

Climate Change May Put Power Grid at Risk in the West

Climate Change May Put Power Grid at Risk in the West

The ravages of climate change could severely hurt the ability of utilities in the 11 Western states to generate power unless they “climate proof” their power grid using renewables and energy efficiency, something they are not prepared for, according to a new study. For nearly half of the West’s existing power plants, climate change could reduce … Read More

Washington’s ‘Wet Drought’ Gets Worse

Washington’s ‘Wet Drought’ Gets Worse

With its snowpack at abysmal levels and some streams recording record low flows, Washington is perhaps looking at a worse drought than it anticipated even a month ago. The impacts already being seen prompted Gov. Jay Inslee on Friday to expanded an emergency drought declaration to cover the whole state. “We’re really starting to feel the pain from… Read More

With Climate Change, Ticks Marching Farther and Earlier

With Climate Change, Ticks Marching Farther and Earlier

You might not be aware of it, but May is Lyme Disease Awareness Month, devoted to reminding people who spend time in wooded areas to cover up. Otherwise, a bite from a black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis, a.k.a. a deer tick) could lead to joint and muscle pain — and in some cases, to chronic arthritis, mental confusion and even heart problems.… Read More

Gallery

Ten Gifts for the Climate Science Geek Satisfy your inner science nerd with these original, climate-themed gifts.

View Gallery