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The Quest to Quench the World’s Thirst for Water

The Quest to Quench the World’s Thirst for Water

As climate change makes rainfall less predictable and droughts more common, a growing number of countries are turning to desalination. The term is used to refer to removing salt from both seawater and subterranean “brackish” water, as well as the treatment of waste water (aka sewerage) to make it drinkable. Some environmentalists have long opposed … Read More

Warmer Oceans Will Make Typhoons More Intense

Warmer Oceans Will Make Typhoons More Intense

While the 2015 Atlantic hurricane season is expected to be relatively quiet, thanks to the influence of a healthy El Nino, the typhoon season in the northwest Pacific has been jam-packed so far, even for an area that normally sees the highest tropical cyclone activity and a large proportion of the strongest storms. One of the earliest Category 5 … Read More

Obama Issues Tropical Storm Forecast, Does Twitter Q&A

Obama Issues Tropical Storm Forecast, Does Twitter Q&A

Add another title to Barack Obama's resume: hurricane forecaster. On Thursday, President Obama spent the morning touring the National Hurricane Center (NHC) in Miami and getting a briefing on the coming Atlantic hurricane season, which begins on June 1. However, the eastern Pacific region saw its hurricane season start two weeks ago on May 15 and … Read More

Will The West Ever Be Able To Live With Fire?

Will The West Ever Be Able To Live With Fire?

Scientific progress and more than a century of living with wildfire have boosted Western resilience to the threat. But improvements in how wildfire dangers have been managed have fallen far short of the reimaginations of landscapes that are needed. “We’ve made good progress, but not good enough,” Jan van Wagtendonk, a retired Yosemite National Par… Read More

10 Years After Katrina, Slow Hurricane Season Expected

10 Years After Katrina, Slow Hurricane Season Expected

As the 10th anniversary of the busiest hurricane season on record approaches, forecasters and government officials are preparing for the start of the 2015 season. But unlike the 2005 season, which saw an unprecedented 28 storms — including one of the worst, Hurricane Katrina — this season is expected to see fewer than the average number of… Read More

Across U.S., Heaviest Downpours On The Rise

Across U.S., Heaviest Downpours On The Rise

Record-breaking rain across Texas and Oklahoma this week caused widespread flooding, the likes of which the region has rarely, if ever, seen. For seven locations there, May 2015 has seen the most rain of any month ever recorded, with five days to go and the rain still coming. While rainfall in the region is consistent with the emerging El Niño, the… Read More

U.S., Mexico, Canada to Collaborate on Climate Adaptation

U.S., Mexico, Canada to Collaborate on Climate Adaptation

Upgrading power grids, reducing greenhouse gas emissions and adapting to climate change are on the agenda for a new international working group composed of the three national energy ministers in the U.S., Canada and Mexico. U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, Canadian Minister of Natural Resources Greg Rickford, and Mexico Secretary of Energy … Read More

El Niño Could Bring Drought and Famine in West Africa

El Niño Could Bring Drought and Famine in West Africa

A global weather phenomenon could cause a famine in the Sahel this year by combining with already dry conditions to create a “double whammy” for the region, scientists and aid groups have warned. Professor Adam Scaife, a long term forecaster at the UK Met Office Hadley Centre, said models now agreed an El Niño event was likely and the first impact… Read More

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Amazon Deforestation Recent deforestation in Brazil has been rapid, causing greenhouse gas emissions.

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