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Shorter Winters Chip Away at a Logging Town’s Future

Shorter Winters Chip Away at a Logging Town’s Future

Scott Lizotte was hopeful as he pulled his iPhone out of the breast pocket of his flannel shirt. "It's going to be six degrees tonight," he said, studying the 10-day forecast. It's mid-March, and he's standing between a skidder and a log loader in a snowy clearing of a 12,000-acre private forest near Tupper Lake, a former lumber town in New York's … Read More

Climate Change: One More Problem for Pakistan

Climate Change: One More Problem for Pakistan

The Indus river, originating on the Tibetan Plateau and flowing for nearly 2,000 miles through the disputed territory of Jammu and Kashmir and finally down to the province of Sindh and out into the Arabian Sea, is key to life in Pakistan. The majority of Pakistan’s 190 million people are involved in agriculture: the Indus, fed by glaciers high up… Read More

From 2012 to 2013, March Blows Hot, Then Cold

From 2012 to 2013, March Blows Hot, Then Cold

Think of the Arctic as the Northern Hemisphere’s refrigerator. The blocked weather pattern — which some scientists think may be tied to the rapid warming of the Arctic and the subsequent loss of sea ice cover — has opened the refrigerator door, causing cold air to spill out of the freezer that is the Far North and help develop winter storms in the … Read More

Drought Has Stranglehold on West; Southeast Sees Relief

Drought Has Stranglehold on West; Southeast Sees Relief

The extended drought continues to choke the Western half of the country, with water supply concerns rising in New Mexico and Texas as anxiety about another bone-dry summer is raised. This week, the dryness grew worse in Texas while expanding into California, Montana, and Oregon, so that most of the land west of the Mississippi River was under some … Read More

Arctic Ice Hits Annual Max and it’s 6th Lowest on Record

Arctic Ice Hits Annual Max and it’s 6th Lowest on Record

The skin of sea ice that covers the Arctic Ocean has reached its maximum extent for 2013, the National Snow and Ice Data Center announced Monday, and the annual melt season has begun. As of March 15, ice covered 5.84 million square miles (15.13 sq. km.) of ocean, the sixth-lowest since satellite observations began in the 1970’s, and 283,000 square … Read More

Volcanic Eruption in Iceland Did Little to Lower CO2

Volcanic Eruption in Iceland Did Little to Lower CO2

Plankton, tiny marine organisms, are a good way of cleansing the atmosphere of one of the main greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide. To do this they need dissolved iron to help them to grow, and if they lack iron then they cannot do much to reduce CO2 levels. So the eruption in 2010 of an Icelandic volcano gave scientists a perfect opportunity to see h… Read More

It’s ‘Survival of the Fattest’ for Canada’s Polar Bears

It’s ‘Survival of the Fattest’ for Canada’s Polar Bears

One of the most southerly populations of polar bears now has only limited time to hunt on sea ice due to a warming climate, research suggests. The polar bears of Hudson Bay, Canada, migrate onto land in the summer when the sea ice melts, relying on fat reserves to survive until the sea refreezes in late November or early December. During the winter… Read More

For Engineers, Climate Failure Becomes an Option

For Engineers, Climate Failure Becomes an Option

Civil engineers build rugged things designed to last for decades, like roads, bridges, culverts and water treatment plants. But a University of New Hampshire professor wants his profession to become much more flexible. In a changing climate, civil engineer Paul Kirshen argues, facilities will have to adapt to changing conditions over their useful … Read More