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Study: Warming May Bring Heightened Salmonella Risk

Study: Warming May Bring Heightened Salmonella Risk

Living along the shoreline may be nice, but a new study suggests that as climate change makes extreme weather and temperature events more frequent, cases of salmonella poisoning may become more prevalent, too, especially in some coastal communities. Each year, it is estimated that 1 million people in the United States become sickened from … Read More

Missing: One Year’s Worth of California Rain

Missing: One Year’s Worth of California Rain

The amount of rain that California has missed out on since the beginning of its record-setting drought in 2012 is about the same amount it would see, on average, in a single year, a new study has concluded. The study’s researchers pin the reason for the lack of rains, as others have, on the absence of the intense rainstorms ushered in by so-called… Read More

Drought May Stunt Forests’ Ability to Capture Carbon

Drought May Stunt Forests’ Ability to Capture Carbon

Forests are sometimes called the lungs of the earth — they breathe in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and store it in tree trunks until the forest dies or burns. A new study, however, shows that forests devastated by drought may lose their ability to store carbon over a much longer period than previously thought, reducing their role as a buffer … Read More

Rain, Storm Surge Combine to Put U.S. Coasts at Risk

Rain, Storm Surge Combine to Put U.S. Coasts at Risk

After the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, New Orleanians thought they knew what areas were susceptible to flooding during a storm. So when Hurricane Isaac, a much weaker storm than Katrina, bore down on the city in 2012, those who live to the west of Lake Pontchartrain weren’t worried, as they had been spared the raging waters that inundated so… Read More

GAO Report Sees Climate Risks to Army Corps Projects

GAO Report Sees Climate Risks to Army Corps Projects

Thousands of dams, levees, hurricane barriers and flood walls built across the country by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers may be at risk from extreme weather and sea level rise driven by climate change, but the Army Corps has only just begun to assess how vulnerable they are and suffers from a lack of funding, according to a U.S. Government … Read More

Stagnant Summer Days on the Rise in U.S.

Stagnant Summer Days on the Rise in U.S.

Those long, hot, sultry days of summer, the ones where the air seem so still it wouldn’t disturb a leaf, are also days where air quality can take a nosedive. With winds barely above a whisper and atmosphere-scouring rains nowhere in sight, pollutants can build up in the air we breathe, with potentially serious health consequences. Since climate… Read More

How This El Niño Is And Isn’t Like 1997

How This El Niño Is And Isn’t Like 1997

It was the winter of 1997-1998 when the granddaddy of El Niños — the one by which all other El Niños are judged — vaulted the climate term to household name status. It had such a noticeable impact on U.S. weather that it appeared everywhere from news coverage of mudslides in Southern California to Chris Farley’s legendary skit on “Saturday Night… Read More

Heavier Rains Mean More Toxic Blooms for Lake Erie

Heavier Rains Mean More Toxic Blooms for Lake Erie

Come September, Lake Erie might face a toxic algae bloom that could rival the record-setting spread of scum that happened in 2011. And such blooms could become more common as the warming climate fuels more downpours that wash bloom-fueling fertilizers into the lake. The forecast for a severe bloom this year, made in early July by scientists with … Read More

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CO2 Capture CO2 captured from coal-fired electric power plants may be injected for storage into porous layers of rock and sand deep undergro

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