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Africa’s Most Vulnerable Face an Even Hotter Future

Africa’s Most Vulnerable Face an Even Hotter Future

Already home to some of the most environmentally vulnerable populations on the planet, Africa looks to increasingly feel the sting of climate change through more frequent, widespread and intense heat waves. Extreme heat that would be considered unusual today could become a yearly occurrence there by mid-century, one new study suggests, and the… Read More

Cities ‘Woefully Unprepared’ for Rising Disaster Risk

Cities ‘Woefully Unprepared’ for Rising Disaster Risk

Cities around the world are failing to plan for fast-increasing risks from extreme weather and other hazards, particularly as population growth and surging migration put more people in the path of those threats, the World Bank said. By 2050, 1.3 billion people and $158 trillion in assets will be menaced by worsening river and coastal floods alone… Read More

Second Warmest Start to the Year on Record for U.S.

Second Warmest Start to the Year on Record for U.S.

While the weather is chilly and rainy along much of the East Coast, the Lower 48 as a whole is having its second hottest year to date, thanks in large part to major western warmth, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Friday. That warmth extended all the way up to Alaska, which is seeing its warmest year on record and … Read More

Hurricanes Boost Carbon Storage in Southeastern Forests

Hurricanes Boost Carbon Storage in Southeastern Forests

Hurricanes hitting the Southeast coast can supercharge the region’s forests, spurring them to store more than 100 times the carbon released annually by all vehicles in the U.S., Duke University researchers have found. Rainfall associated with hurricanes acts as fuel for photosynthesis, drastically increasing trees’ carbon absorption rates… Read More

When the Rains Disappear: Drought Grips Pacific Islands

When the Rains Disappear: Drought Grips Pacific Islands

From the vantage point of a boat bobbing on the deep blue waters of Majuro Lagoon, the encircling shores of the Pacific coral atoll are normally verdant with tropical vegetation. But on a recent sailing excursion with friends, Angela Saunders was struck by how brown and withered the island looked. “The vibrant color of all the trees was gone."… Read More

Here’s the Climate Context For the Fort McMurray Wildfire

Here’s the Climate Context For the Fort McMurray Wildfire

An unusually intense May wildfire roared into Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, on Tuesday, forcing the largest wildfire evacuation in province history. The flames rode the back of hot, windy weather that will continue through Wednesday and could pick up again this weekend. The wildfire is the latest in a lengthening lineage of early wildfires in no… Read More

Strong El Niño Helped Lower U.S. Heating Costs

Strong El Niño Helped Lower U.S. Heating Costs

Was your heating bill a bit friendlier to your wallet this winter? If so, there’s a good chance you can thank El Niño. The exceptionally strong El Niño in the Pacific has been driving chaotic weather across the globe for months, but it also contributed to a mild winter in the U.S., which was about 15 percent warmer than the winter of 2014-2015.… Read More

Warming Means Nicer U.S. Weather, But It Won’t Last

Warming Means Nicer U.S. Weather, But It Won’t Last

As the world has warmed over the past few decades, climate scientists have increasingly sounded the alarm over the potentially catastrophic impacts that warming could have on the world’s weather. But in the U.S., that message may have been lost on most Americans because their day-to-day weather has actually become more pleasant, according to a new… Read More

Gallery

More U.S. Downpours Nationwide, the number of days with the most intense precipitation continues to climb.

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