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Monsoon Sets Up ‘Race Against the Clock’ in Nepal

Monsoon Sets Up ‘Race Against the Clock’ in Nepal

The prospect of aftershocks continue to keep Nepal on edge after a major earthquake shook the country in late April. The magnitude 7.8 earthquake and its aftershocks have left an estimated 500,000 families homeless, more than 8,000 dead and scarred the country with at least 3,000 landslides. But another issue for quake-rattled Nepal is brewing … Read More

Texas, Oklahoma Drought ‘All But Over’

Texas, Oklahoma Drought ‘All But Over’

While the Western drought has its claws firmly dug in, the nearly five-year drought that has gripped Oklahoma and Texas is on its last legs, thanks to recent torrents of rain, government climate scientists said Thursday. “I think the Texas drought is pretty much all but over,” Victor Murphy, climate services program manager for the National Weather… Read More

Washington’s ‘Wet Drought’ Gets Worse

Washington’s ‘Wet Drought’ Gets Worse

With its snowpack at abysmal levels and some streams recording record low flows, Washington is perhaps looking at a worse drought than it anticipated even a month ago. The impacts already being seen prompted Gov. Jay Inslee on Friday to expanded an emergency drought declaration to cover the whole state. “We’re really starting to feel the pain from… Read More

El Niño Gains Momentum, Could Bring Warmest Year

El Niño Gains Momentum, Could Bring Warmest Year

The weak El Niño that has been in place since February seems to be gaining steam, with U.S. forecasters betting it will hang around through the end of the year, increasing the odds that the event could help make 2015 the warmest year on the books. “If El Niño continues to evolve and possibly strengthen throughout the year as the Climate… Read More

Is Warming Changing Boundaries of Hurricane Season?

Is Warming Changing Boundaries of Hurricane Season?

Hurricane season doesn’t officially begin until June 1, but tell that to Tropical Storm Ana, which made landfall on the South Carolina coast early May 10. May storms, while unusual, aren’t unprecedented, since the official season dates are artificial. Records suggest they happen about once every six years. But in the ever-present context of a… Read More

The Bright Side of 13 Years of Clouds in 1 Map

The Bright Side of 13 Years of Clouds in 1 Map

Cloudy days can be a bit of a downer. But when you add them all from nearly 13 years of measurements, the bright side becomes more apparent. NASA Earth Observatory just published a map that uses data collected between July 2002 and April 2015 to give an unparalleled view of the world’s cloudy (and sunny) spots. One thing that’s immediately apparent… Read More

Arctic Ice Melting Faster and Earlier With Dire Results

Arctic Ice Melting Faster and Earlier With Dire Results

There was less ice in the Arctic this winter than in any other winter during the satellite era, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientists said on Tuesday. The announcement was consistent with previous predictions that the Arctic would have entirely ice-free summers by 2040, they said in a briefing to the media on the state of clima… Read More

Warming Could Bring More Downpours Like OKC’s

Warming Could Bring More Downpours Like OKC’s

While tornadoes normally take center stage during severe weather season, for Oklahoma City on Wednesday, it was torrential rains and flash flooding that overshadowed the twisters. The city recorded more than 7 inches of rain in 24 hours, the third-highest single day rainfall total for any day of the calendar year, with records going back to 1891.… Read More

Gallery

Wild Winter Weather Some wild winter weather has hit parts of Central and Eastern regions of the U.S. in the past few weeks.

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