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How Rising Seas Drowned the Flood Insurance Program

How Rising Seas Drowned the Flood Insurance Program

ong Beach Island is the largest and richest barrier island in New Jersey, an oasis of sprawling oceanfront retreats and second homes located midway down the state’s heavily developed coast, a two-hour drive from the metropolitan centers of New York City and Philadelphia. On a clear day, visitors in the southern end can see the shiny facades of the … Read More

NOAA Forecasts Busy Hurricane Season for Atlantic

NOAA Forecasts Busy Hurricane Season for Atlantic

Less than a year after Hurricane Matthew raked the East Coast, killing 34 people and causing $10 billion in damage in the U.S. alone, coastal areas are once again preparing for the onset of the Atlantic hurricane season. This year, forecasters with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are expecting to see above-average storm numbers… Read More

Climate Change Could Slash Staple Crops

Climate Change Could Slash Staple Crops

Climate change, and its impacts on extreme weather and temperature swings, is projected to reduce global production of corn, wheat, rice and soybeans by 23 percent in the 2050s, according to a new analysis. The study, which examined price and production of those four major crops from 1961 to 2013, also warns that by the 2030s output could be cut … Read More

El Niño Again? This Is Why It’s Hard to Tell

El Niño Again? This Is Why It’s Hard to Tell

The tropical Pacific Ocean is once again carrying on a will-it-or-won’t-it flirtation with an El Niño event, just a year after the demise of one of the strongest El Niños on record. The odds right now are about even for an El Niño to develop, frustrating forecasters stuck in the middle of what is called the spring predictability barrier… Read More

America’s Most Vulnerable to Rising Seas

America’s Most Vulnerable to Rising Seas

Coastal communities are enduring growing flood risks from rising seas, with places like Atlantic City, sandwiched between a bay and the ocean, facing some of the greatest threats. Guided by new research by Climate Central’s Scott Kulp and Benjamin Strauss, reporter John Upton and photographer Ted Blanco chronicled the plight of this city’s… Read More

U.S. Drought at Lowest Level in Nearly Two Decades

U.S. Drought at Lowest Level in Nearly Two Decades

After years of intense, record-setting drought across the U.S., particularly in the Great Plains and California, the country is now experiencing its lowest level of drought in the 17 years since the U.S. Drought Monitor began its weekly updates. Less than 5 percent of the U.S. was in some stage of drought as of May 4, the most recent update… Read More

The Overlooked Risk of Levees As Rainfall Rises

The Overlooked Risk of Levees As Rainfall Rises

Thousands of miles of levees stretch across the U.S., built to keep swollen waterways from inundating towns, farmland and critical infrastructure. But, as the residents of Pocahontas, Ark., found out this week when drenching rains caused the Black River to overtop and breach the local levee system, living behind a levee is not an absolute guarantee… Read More

U.N. Risk Chief: Put a Price on Disasters

U.N. Risk Chief: Put a Price on Disasters

Calculating the costs of natural disasters is a valuable way for governments to recognize and limit the potential for damage, especially as extreme weather linked to climate change occurs more often, the United Nations' disaster prevention chief says. Recent deadly landslides caused by floods in Peru and Colombia show the urgent need for … Read More

Gallery

Sea Level Rise and Population Impact Since 1900, sea level has gone up an average of eight inches around the world due to global warming.

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