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Second Warmest Start to the Year on Record for U.S.

Second Warmest Start to the Year on Record for U.S.

While the weather is chilly and rainy along much of the East Coast, the Lower 48 as a whole is having its second hottest year to date, thanks in large part to major western warmth, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Friday. That warmth extended all the way up to Alaska, which is seeing its warmest year on record and … Read More

Hurricanes Boost Carbon Storage in Southeastern Forests

Hurricanes Boost Carbon Storage in Southeastern Forests

Hurricanes hitting the Southeast coast can supercharge the region’s forests, spurring them to store more than 100 times the carbon released annually by all vehicles in the U.S., Duke University researchers have found. Rainfall associated with hurricanes acts as fuel for photosynthesis, drastically increasing trees’ carbon absorption rates… Read More

When the Rains Disappear: Drought Grips Pacific Islands

When the Rains Disappear: Drought Grips Pacific Islands

From the vantage point of a boat bobbing on the deep blue waters of Majuro Lagoon, the encircling shores of the Pacific coral atoll are normally verdant with tropical vegetation. But on a recent sailing excursion with friends, Angela Saunders was struck by how brown and withered the island looked. “The vibrant color of all the trees was gone."… Read More

Here’s the Climate Context For the Fort McMurray Wildfire

Here’s the Climate Context For the Fort McMurray Wildfire

An unusually intense May wildfire roared into Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, on Tuesday, forcing the largest wildfire evacuation in province history. The flames rode the back of hot, windy weather that will continue through Wednesday and could pick up again this weekend. The wildfire is the latest in a lengthening lineage of early wildfires in no… Read More

Strong El Niño Helped Lower U.S. Heating Costs

Strong El Niño Helped Lower U.S. Heating Costs

Was your heating bill a bit friendlier to your wallet this winter? If so, there’s a good chance you can thank El Niño. The exceptionally strong El Niño in the Pacific has been driving chaotic weather across the globe for months, but it also contributed to a mild winter in the U.S., which was about 15 percent warmer than the winter of 2014-2015.… Read More

Warming Means Nicer U.S. Weather, But It Won’t Last

Warming Means Nicer U.S. Weather, But It Won’t Last

As the world has warmed over the past few decades, climate scientists have increasingly sounded the alarm over the potentially catastrophic impacts that warming could have on the world’s weather. But in the U.S., that message may have been lost on most Americans because their day-to-day weather has actually become more pleasant, according to a new… Read More

Greenland’s Melt Season Started Nearly Two Months Early

Greenland’s Melt Season Started Nearly Two Months Early

To say the 2016 Greenland melt season is off to the races is an understatement. Warm, wet conditions rapidly kicked off the melt season this weekend, more than a month-and-a-half ahead of schedule. It has easily set a record for earliest melt season onset, and marks the first time it’s begun in April. Little to no melt through winter is the norm … Read More

Will La Niña Follow One of the Strongest Ever El Niños?

Will La Niña Follow One of the Strongest Ever El Niños?

Back in November, El Niño reached a fever pitch, vaulting into the ranks of the strongest events on record and wreaking havoc on weather patterns around the world. Now it is beginning to wane as the ocean cools, so what comes next? It’s possible that by next fall, the tropical Pacific Ocean could seesaw into a state that is roughly El Niño’s… Read More

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Ten Gifts for the Climate Science Geek Satisfy your inner science nerd with these original, climate-themed gifts.

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