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West Likely to Be Stormier With Climate Change

West Likely to Be Stormier With Climate Change

The types of storms that have been bringing heavy snow and rain to the West this winter, triggering landslides and floods while easing stubborn droughts, are likely to become stronger and more frequent, according to the results of a conclusive new study. The drenching storms have been falling from atmospheric rivers, which are high-altitude streams… Read More

The Southwest May Have Entered a ‘Drier Climate State’

The Southwest May Have Entered a ‘Drier Climate State’

The Southwest is already the most arid part of the U.S. Now new research indicates it’s becoming even more dry as wet weather patterns, quite literally, dry up. The change could herald a pattern shift and raises the specter of megadrought in the region. “We see a very intense trend in the Southwest,” Andreas Prein, a postdoctoral researcher at the … Read More

Warming Ups Odds And Costs of Extreme U.K. Rains

Warming Ups Odds And Costs of Extreme U.K. Rains

Parts of southern England and Wales were swamped with storm after storm after storm during the winter of 2013-2014, as roads turned into streams and fields into lakes. The relentless rains flooded thousands of homes and businesses and cost more than $700 million in damages. It was both the wettest January and the wettest winter ever measured at the… Read More

Watch All of 2015’s Weather in Super High-Def

Watch All of 2015’s Weather in Super High-Def

Another year of wild weather is behind us. But thanks to EUMETSAT, you can now relive it in amazing high-definition video from space. The new visualization uses geostationary satellite data from EUMETSAT, the Japan Meteorological Agency and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to stitch together 365 days of data into one stunning … Read More

Wildfires Are Burning Some of the World’s Oldest Trees

Wildfires Are Burning Some of the World’s Oldest Trees

Northwest Tasmania is home to part of the Gondwana forest. It’s a stretch of primeval-looking temperate rainforest, much like the one found in the Pacific Northwest’s Olympic National Park. Trees more than 1,000 years old tower above ancient ferns, forming a connection to the distant past. It’s why the region has been designated a UNESCO World … Read More

Ocean Warming is Making Floods Worse, Study Finds

Ocean Warming is Making Floods Worse, Study Finds

Floodwaters that washed icy brine into streets and homes along the eastern seaboard during Saturday’s blizzard reached heights in some places not experienced since Hurricane Sandy. “I just hope it isn’t a sign of things to come,” Pam Bross told a local newspaper as she mopped up the market she operates on a New Jersey street not normally reached by… Read More

Atlantic, Caribbean Storms Strengthen With Warming

Atlantic, Caribbean Storms Strengthen With Warming

Hurricanes in the Atlantic and Caribbean oceans will grow more than twice as powerful and damaging as ocean temperatures rise from global warming, a new study says. Warming seas could produce more rainfall and far more destructive storm surges of water along the ocean shorelines in the next 50 to 100 years, said the study by U.S. scientists… Read More

The Future of ‘Epic Blizzards’ in a Warming World

The Future of ‘Epic Blizzards’ in a Warming World

In case you haven’t heard, Washington, D.C., and other parts of the Mid-Atlantic region, are about to get walloped by a major storm that could bury the city in a record-breaking amount of snow. The storm is expected to bring snows that could top 2 feet in the D.C. area and has already resulted in thousands of cancelled flights. While snows may not… Read More

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CO2 Injection CO2 captured from coal-fired electric power plants may be injected for storage into porous layers of rock and sand

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