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The $90 Trillion Climate-Stabilizing Cookbook

The $90 Trillion Climate-Stabilizing Cookbook

We’re baking the world; on track to raise global temperatures by more than 7°F by burning fuels, raising livestock, bulldozing forests, and allowing cities to sprawl as they grow. Pulling the planet out of the costly slow-cooker of old-fashioned traditions in time to avoid the worst of global warming might not be easy. But doing so would make the w… Read More

Climate Change Threatens Half of North America’s Birds

Climate Change Threatens Half of North America’s Birds

Half of North America’s bird species, from common backyard visitors like the Baltimore oriole and the rufous hummingbird to wilderness dwellers like the common loon and bald eagle, are under threat from climate change and many could go extinct, an exhaustive new study has found. Seven years of research found climate change the biggest threat to Nor… Read More

Picture This: Summer Snow and Gnarly Lightning

Picture This: Summer Snow and Gnarly Lightning

It was a weird week for weather, that's for sure. Snows fell from Calgary to Rapid City -- in the middle of September. That's early even for Canada! Meanwhile monsoon rains, helped along my moisture from the remnants of tropical storms, soaked parts of the Southwest, not used to such deluges. We've got photos of those two events, as well as look ba… Read More

Warming Air Was Trigger for Antarctic Ice Shelf Collapse

Warming Air Was Trigger for Antarctic Ice Shelf Collapse

It was clear to anyone who went to Antarctica in the summer of 2001-02 that it was an unusually warm one — record-setting, in fact — and just one in a series of warm austral summers. In December 2001, geologic oceanographer Eugene Domack, now at the University of South Florida, was part of an expedition sampling the Southern Ocean seafloor around… Read More

Struggling El Niño Still Shaping Hurricane Activity

Struggling El Niño Still Shaping Hurricane Activity

September 10 generally marks the peak of hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean basin, but this year there are no tropical cyclones to be seen. Currently, there are only two stormy areas that have only small chances of developing into tropical storms over the next few days. For that dearth of activity, you can thank El Niño, or at least the… Read More

Time for Trees to Pack Their Trunks?

Time for Trees to Pack Their Trunks?

During the last two springs, contract planters for The Nature Conservancy have spread out through the pine, spruce and aspen forest of northeastern Minnesota. Wielding steel hoedads, they have planted almost 110,000 tree seedlings on public land. What’s noteworthy about planting trees in a forest? Usually foresters plant seedlings grown from seeds … Read More

Picture This: Rainbows, Rainbows & More Rainbows

Picture This: Rainbows, Rainbows & More Rainbows

We can’t seem to go a week without a storm producing one amazing photo of a rainbow or another, be they of the single, double or triple variety. This week was no exception, as you will see below, with three stunning shots. Of course, plenty of other weather phenomena produced wow-worthy pictures of their own. There’s always something amazing to see… Read More

Drought Divide: Tropical Rains to Help Plains, Not SoCal

Drought Divide: Tropical Rains to Help Plains, Not SoCal

The remnants of two tropical systems — one from the Gulf of Mexico, the other just west of Baja California — are expected to serve as wells of moisture fueling rains this weekend over portions of the country’s two main drought hotspots, namely parts of the Southern Plains and Southern California. But while those rains could make dents in the Plains… Read More