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Missing: One Year’s Worth of California Rain

Missing: One Year’s Worth of California Rain

The amount of rain that California has missed out on since the beginning of its record-setting drought in 2012 is about the same amount it would see, on average, in a single year, a new study has concluded. The study’s researchers pin the reason for the lack of rains, as others have, on the absence of the intense rainstorms ushered in by so-called… Read More

Drought May Stunt Forests’ Ability to Capture Carbon

Drought May Stunt Forests’ Ability to Capture Carbon

Forests are sometimes called the lungs of the earth — they breathe in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and store it in tree trunks until the forest dies or burns. A new study, however, shows that forests devastated by drought may lose their ability to store carbon over a much longer period than previously thought, reducing their role as a buffer … Read More

How This El Niño Is And Isn’t Like 1997

How This El Niño Is And Isn’t Like 1997

It was the winter of 1997-1998 when the granddaddy of El Niños — the one by which all other El Niños are judged — vaulted the climate term to household name status. It had such a noticeable impact on U.S. weather that it appeared everywhere from news coverage of mudslides in Southern California to Chris Farley’s legendary skit on “Saturday Night… Read More

Record Warmth Continues to Bake U.S. West

Record Warmth Continues to Bake U.S. West

The U.S. West is still baking. The temperatures for June are in and five Western states saw their warmest June ever (helping to make the month the second warmest June for the contiguous U.S.), and four continue to see their warmest year-to-date, just as 2015 hits the halfway mark. In drought-plagued California, “we’re beating the record set… Read More

Soaring Temps in Pacific Northwest Shattered Records

Soaring Temps in Pacific Northwest Shattered Records

Scorching temperatures above 110°F are more often associated with the stark landscapes of places like Death Valley than the cooler reaches of the Pacific Northwest. But a suped-up heat wave has left parts of Washington feeling much more like the desert Southwest and has shattered longstanding high temperature records in many spots. The searing heat… Read More

Study: Water Use Skyrockets as Fracking Expands

Study: Water Use Skyrockets as Fracking Expands

Oil and natural gas fracking, on average, uses more than 28 times the water it did 15 years ago, gulping up to 9.6 million gallons of water per well and putting farming and drinking sources at risk in arid states, especially during drought … Read More

Study Suggests Key Role for Warming in Extreme Weather

Study Suggests Key Role for Warming in Extreme Weather

When massive storms inundate coastlines or a veritable snowpocalypse keeps a city buried for days, the first question on many minds is: Was climate change to blame? It may play more of a role than previous studies have suggested, according to scientists who advocate a different approach to searching for the fingerprints of warming in extreme … Read More

El Niño Forecast Brings Calif. Hope for Drought Relief

El Niño Forecast Brings Calif. Hope for Drought Relief

El Niño is gaining steam in the Pacific Ocean and forecasters are now leaning towards it being a strong event, the first since the blockbuster El Niño of 1997-1998. That possibility is again raising the collective hopes of Californians that this winter may finally see some desperately needed precipitation to begin the slow climb out of a historic… Read More

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CO2 Capture and Sequestration CO2 may be separated from other gases at coal-fired electric power plants and transported by pipeline to suitable storage sites.

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