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Warming May Boost Wind Energy in Plains States

Warming May Boost Wind Energy in Plains States

Powerful winds are commonplace in the U.S. prairie states, which experienced walls of dirt swept into the air by these gusts during the Dust Bowl. While today's winds don't often carry the huge quantities of dust that they did in the 1930s, they’re stirring up something significantly more useful in states like Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas – energy. … Read More

U.S. Private Sector Vows To Ante Up On Climate Finance

U.S. Private Sector Vows To Ante Up On Climate Finance

Some of the biggest U.S. corporate names on Monday offered their support - and billions of dollars in green financing pledges - to buttress the Obama administration's quest for a global agreement on combating climate change. Google, Apple, Goldman Sachs and 10 other well-known companies joined the White House in launching the American Business Act… Read More

Rain, Storm Surge Combine to Put U.S. Coasts at Risk

Rain, Storm Surge Combine to Put U.S. Coasts at Risk

After the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, New Orleanians thought they knew what areas were susceptible to flooding during a storm. So when Hurricane Isaac, a much weaker storm than Katrina, bore down on the city in 2012, those who live to the west of Lake Pontchartrain weren’t worried, as they had been spared the raging waters that inundated so… Read More

Rising Sea Levels Could Decimate Sea Turtle Nests

Rising Sea Levels Could Decimate Sea Turtle Nests

Rising sea levels could decimate sea turtle nesting sites around the world, scientists have warned, with the largest rookery site for green turtles increasingly at risk from being swamped by seawater. Researchers have tested the impact of seawater upon turtle eggs in an attempt to find out why so few hatchlings were emerging on Raine Island.… Read More

Are Countries Obligated to Fend Off Climate Change?

Are Countries Obligated to Fend Off Climate Change?

On June 24, 2015, a court in The Hague ordered the Dutch government to act faster in its duty to protect its citizens against the effects of climate change. This marks the first time the issue has been legally declared a state obligation, regardless of arguments that the solution to the global climate problem does not depend on one country’s effort… Read More

GAO Report Sees Climate Risks to Army Corps Projects

GAO Report Sees Climate Risks to Army Corps Projects

Thousands of dams, levees, hurricane barriers and flood walls built across the country by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers may be at risk from extreme weather and sea level rise driven by climate change, but the Army Corps has only just begun to assess how vulnerable they are and suffers from a lack of funding, according to a U.S. Government … Read More

Stagnant Summer Days on the Rise in U.S.

Stagnant Summer Days on the Rise in U.S.

Those long, hot, sultry days of summer, the ones where the air seem so still it wouldn’t disturb a leaf, are also days where air quality can take a nosedive. With winds barely above a whisper and atmosphere-scouring rains nowhere in sight, pollutants can build up in the air we breathe, with potentially serious health consequences. Since climate… Read More

How This El Niño Is And Isn’t Like 1997

How This El Niño Is And Isn’t Like 1997

It was the winter of 1997-1998 when the granddaddy of El Niños — the one by which all other El Niños are judged — vaulted the climate term to household name status. It had such a noticeable impact on U.S. weather that it appeared everywhere from news coverage of mudslides in Southern California to Chris Farley’s legendary skit on “Saturday Night… Read More

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2012 Global Carbon Emissions Human-generated emissions of CO2 this year are expected to reach 35.6 billion tons.

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