News Section
Stories from Climate Central's Science Journalists and Content Partners

Climate Change: One More Problem for Pakistan

Climate Change: One More Problem for Pakistan

The Indus river, originating on the Tibetan Plateau and flowing for nearly 2,000 miles through the disputed territory of Jammu and Kashmir and finally down to the province of Sindh and out into the Arabian Sea, is key to life in Pakistan. The majority of Pakistan’s 190 million people are involved in agriculture: the Indus, fed by glaciers high up… Read More

Six to See: Slideshow on Week’s Top Climate News

Six to See: Slideshow on Week’s Top Climate News

Arctic sea ice stats, volcanic eruptions, polar bears, pollen and more in a slideshow of the week's top climate news. … Read More

From 2012 to 2013, March Blows Hot, Then Cold

From 2012 to 2013, March Blows Hot, Then Cold

Think of the Arctic as the Northern Hemisphere’s refrigerator. The blocked weather pattern — which some scientists think may be tied to the rapid warming of the Arctic and the subsequent loss of sea ice cover — has opened the refrigerator door, causing cold air to spill out of the freezer that is the Far North and help develop winter storms in the … Read More

Two Key Climate Change Concepts Are ‘Misunderstood’

Two Key Climate Change Concepts Are ‘Misunderstood’

Damon Matthews of Concordia University in Montreal and Susan Solomon of MIT make the case that policymakers, the media, and to some extent the public have misunderstood the implications of two key concepts — the “irreversibility” of climate change, and the amount of global warming already in the pipeline due to historical greenhous… Read More

New Process May Make Renewable Energy Reliable at Last

New Process May Make Renewable Energy Reliable at Last

Solar energy is virtually limitless, generates no planet-warming greenhouse gases — and is useless between sunset and sunrise. Wind energy is also plentiful and emits no carbon, and it can be harvested day or night, but not when the air is calm. A discovery announced in Thursday’s issue of Science may offer a way around these daunting problems, … Read More

Drought Has Stranglehold on West; Southeast Sees Relief

Drought Has Stranglehold on West; Southeast Sees Relief

The extended drought continues to choke the Western half of the country, with water supply concerns rising in New Mexico and Texas as anxiety about another bone-dry summer is raised. This week, the dryness grew worse in Texas while expanding into California, Montana, and Oregon, so that most of the land west of the Mississippi River was under some … Read More

Why the Globe Hasn’t Warmed Much for the Past Decade

Why the Globe Hasn’t Warmed Much for the Past Decade

Even the quickest glance at a graph of global temperatures makes it clear that the planet was warming sharply during the 1980s and 1990s. But while the 2000s were the hottest decade on record, the rate of warming slowed considerably after the turn of the current century — even while human emissions of heat-trapping greenhouse gas emissions have … Read More

Climate Change is Increasing Seasonal Allergies

Climate Change is Increasing Seasonal Allergies

Each spring, blooming flowers and trees are a hallmark of the season’s warmer weather. But their pollen is aggravating for people suffering from seasonal allergies, and can be downright dangerous for people with asthma. In fact, around this time each year, web searches soar for things like “pollen,” “allergies,” and “Claritin.” And this year is no … Read More