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Indigenous Stories Are Filling Gaps in Climate Data

Indigenous Stories Are Filling Gaps in Climate Data

Canadian scientists have collected stories from more than 90,000 people whose traditional ways of life rely on nature, in an effort to capture signs of climate change where weather stations are absent. Their findings, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, fill a knowledge gap in climate change science, which is dominated by data and… Read More

Warming to Bring ‘Epidemic’ of Heat-Related Injuries

Warming to Bring ‘Epidemic’ of Heat-Related Injuries

Workers in fields and factories face an epidemic of heat-related injuries that will devastate their health, income and productivity as climate change takes hold, a major UN report has warned. Productivity losses alone could rise above $2tn by 2030, as outdoor employees in many regions slow their pace, take longer breaks and shift their work to… Read More

Satellite Shows U.S. Has the Most Gas Flares in the World

Satellite Shows U.S. Has the Most Gas Flares in the World

Drive through many oil and gas fields in the U.S. and one thing stands out above the pumpjacks and storage tanks, especially at night — steadily flickering flames. Those flames are known as gas flares, which burn off excess natural gas from crude oil and natural gas wells across the globe. Scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric … Read More

Climate Change is ‘Devastating’ The Great Barrier Reef

Climate Change is ‘Devastating’ The Great Barrier Reef

Warm ocean waters that sucked the color and vigor from sweeping stretches of the world’s greatest expanse of corals last month were driven by climate change, according to a new analysis by scientists, who are warning of worse impacts ahead. Climate change made it 170 times more likely that the surface waters of the Coral Sea, which off the… Read More

Strong El Niño Helped Lower U.S. Heating Costs

Strong El Niño Helped Lower U.S. Heating Costs

Was your heating bill a bit friendlier to your wallet this winter? If so, there’s a good chance you can thank El Niño. The exceptionally strong El Niño in the Pacific has been driving chaotic weather across the globe for months, but it also contributed to a mild winter in the U.S., which was about 15 percent warmer than the winter of 2014-2015.… Read More

Carbon Fee Debate Goes Mainstream in Washington State

Carbon Fee Debate Goes Mainstream in Washington State

As governments worldwide begin imposing fees on pollution to try to protect the climate, a debate over dueling approaches — one that has long been restricted to conferences and academia — is becoming prominent in Washington state. Washington voters will decide in November whether to introduce a carbon tax on fossil fuels and electricity from coal … Read More

1,000 Species Have Been Moved Due to Human Impact

1,000 Species Have Been Moved Due to Human Impact

More than 1,000 species have had to be relocated because of climate change, poaching and humans taking their habitat, according to a top conservationist. Dr Axel Moehrenschlager said cases of “translocation,” such as India’s plan to relocate tigers to Cambodia or South Africa’s scheme to airlift rhinos to Australia, have increased exponentially… Read More

With The Paris Agreement Signed, Hard Work Begins

With The Paris Agreement Signed, Hard Work Begins

Diplomats and leaders representing more than half the world’s countries on Friday gave a global effort to slow climate change a ceremonial nudge forward. The signing in New York of the Paris Agreement, which is a United Nations climate treaty that was finalized during high-profile negotiations in France in December, was a symbolic overture to year … Read More

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Spring is Coming Earlier A state-by-state look at how spring is coming earlier, on average, in a warming world.

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