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At $24 Trillion, Oceans are World’s 7th-Largest Economy

At $24 Trillion, Oceans are World’s 7th-Largest Economy

The monetary value of the world’s oceans has been estimated at $24 trillion in a new report that warns that overfishing, pollution and climate change are putting an unprecedented strain upon marine ecosystems. The report, commissioned by WWF, states the asset value of oceans is $24 trillion and values the annual “goods and services” it provides, … Read More

Look What’s Cooking in the World of Renewable Energy

Look What’s Cooking in the World of Renewable Energy

Inside a sprawling single-story office building in Bedford, Mass., in a secret room known as the Growth Hall, the future of solar power is cooking at more than 2,500 °F. Behind closed doors and downturned blinds, custom-built ovens with ambitious names like “Fearless” and “Intrepid” are helping to perfect a new technique of making silicon wafers, t… Read More

Carbon Pricing Helping Farmers Ease Methane Pollution

Carbon Pricing Helping Farmers Ease Methane Pollution

Biogas digesters are helping to protect the climate from methane, which is a far more potent greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. As the world’s appetite for meat and dairy has grown, agriculture has become a bigger cause of global warming than deforestation, and that’s mostly because of the methane released by livestock farming.… Read More

New NASA Satellite Gets the Dirt on Soil Moisture

New NASA Satellite Gets the Dirt on Soil Moisture

Tracking soil moisture is a dirty job, but someone’s gotta do it. Soil moisture is a critical indicator of drought. For decades, ground observations have done the heavy lifting but they’re few and far between. That’s why NASA spent $1 billion to launch a soil moisture monitoring satellite earlier this year. After months of calibration, the… Read More

Scientists Turn to Drones For Closer Look at Sea Ice

Scientists Turn to Drones For Closer Look at Sea Ice

An oceanographer at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory is calling on a 21st century technology to understand exactly how the floating ice that clogs the world’s northernmost seas every winter breaks up and melts.… Read More

Since First Earth Day, U.S. Temps Have Been On the Rise

Since First Earth Day, U.S. Temps Have Been On the Rise

It’s been 45 years since the first Earth Day was celebrated in 1970, and since that time, average temperatures have been rising across the U.S. This Climate Central interactive graphic shows a state-by-state analysis of those temperature trends. Average temperatures across most of the continental U.S. have been rising gradually for more than a… Read More

The State of the Earth in 4 Climate Trends

The State of the Earth in 4 Climate Trends

What better day to step back and take stock of the planet than Earth Day? Started in 1970 to raise awareness in the U.S. about the environmental state of the planet, Earth Day is now celebrated in more than 190 countries and has led to the creation of legislation in the U.S. aimed at protecting the environment. But one global trend has continued… Read More

White House: Upgrade Grid to Withstand Climate Change

White House: Upgrade Grid to Withstand Climate Change

The White House says all the pipelines, power lines, railways and the other infrastructure that bring Americans the energy they use each day will have to be modernized in the face of climate change and a renaissance in renewable energy.… Read More

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All the Ice on Greenland Greenland holds enough ice to raise global sea level 23 feet or to fill the Lower 48 states 2,940 feet high, like a bathtub.

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