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Tropical Dams an Underestimated Methane Source

Tropical Dams an Underestimated Methane Source

Big dams built in the tropics to produce hydroelectricity have long been highly controversial — data gathered in Laos by a French team studying methane emissions confirms that dams can add to global warming, not reduce it. In many rocky regions low on vegetation and population, such as in Iceland and other northern mountainous regions, the prod… Read More

China Works Toward Kicking its Coal Habit

China Works Toward Kicking its Coal Habit

There are still doubts. The statistics might be proved wrong. But it looks as if China might be starting to wean itself off its coal consumption habit. China produces and consumes nearly as much coal as the rest of the world combined. Coal, the most polluting of all energy sources, has powered the growth of China’s flyaway economy. But as incomes h… Read More

UN Highlights Climate Big Data Ahead of Summit

UN Highlights Climate Big Data Ahead of Summit

Data is buzzing around us all the time, and whether you realize it or not, you utilize data everyday, be it how much your daily cup of coffee costs or how long it takes to get to work. Now imagine doing that on a much bigger picture, organizing millions of pieces of information and making it useful. That’s exactly what scientists are up to when th… Read More

Cut Carbon, Breathe Easier, Live Longer

Cut Carbon, Breathe Easier, Live Longer

What if I offered you an investment that would make us all healthier, save thousands of lives, and pay for itself? It would be hard to turn down a deal like that. According to a new study from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, there is such an investment, and it’s called cap and trade—the market-based plan to reduce carbon pollution that i… Read More

Depths of Atlantic May Hold Key to Global Warming Hiatus

Depths of Atlantic May Hold Key to Global Warming Hiatus

The key to the slowdown in global warming in recent years could lie in the depths of the Atlantic and Southern oceans where excess heat is being stored – not the Pacific Ocean as has previously been suggested, according to new research. But the finding suggests that a naturally occurring ocean cycle burying the heat will flip in around 15 years’ ti… Read More

Marine Economy Takes a Dive as Ocean Acidity Rises

Marine Economy Takes a Dive as Ocean Acidity Rises

The waters off the U.S. state of Alaska are some of the best fishing grounds anywhere, teeming with salmon and with shellfish such as crab. But a new study, funded by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration(NOAA), says growing acidification of Alaska’s waters, particularly those off the southern coast, threatens the state’s whole e… Read More

New CO2 Satellite Sends First Data Back to Earth

New CO2 Satellite Sends First Data Back to Earth

NASA’s new carbon dioxide-monitoring satellite just opened its eyes for the first time. Based on the initial data its sending back to Earth, it appears to have 20/20 vision and scientists will soon have plenty more data to analyze. The satellite, dubbed the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2, or OCO-2, was launched last month as part of an effort to be… Read More

Steady Increase in Flights Will Outweigh Carbon Cuts

Steady Increase in Flights Will Outweigh Carbon Cuts

percent of global carbon dioxide emissions coming from its aircraft. The problem is the speed at which aviation itself is growing. One aircraft builder believes the number of planes in service in 2011 will have doubled by 2031. Whatever the industry’s efforts to reduce its carbon emissions, they will be outweighed by the growth in air traffic, even… Read More