News Section
Stories from Climate Central's Science Journalists and Content Partners

Greenland Ice Sheet Melt Could Occur Yearly By 2100

Greenland Ice Sheet Melt Could Occur Yearly By 2100

In July 2012, Greenland ice sheet watchers sounded the alarm as 97 percent of the ice sheet surface melted. It was a rare occurrence, one that left researchers puzzling over the exact causes and its likelihood in the future. New research released Monday sheds light on the causes behind the melt and includes projections that show if greenhouse gas e… Read More

IEA Graphic Shows How to Radically Reduce CO2

IEA Graphic Shows How to Radically Reduce CO2

The IEA has created a fascinating interactive graphic to help people visualize how radically carbon dioxide emissions might need to be reduced by 2050 to prevent certain degrees of global warming… Read More

Dust in the Wind Never Looked So Stunning

Dust in the Wind Never Looked So Stunning

Watching sea salt, dust, and soot might not sound like the most exciting way to spend your Friday afternoon. But put aside your prejudice for a second (or 177 seconds to be exact) and check out this video. Winds are constantly moving these and other particles, called aerosols, through the earth’s atmosphere. The animation above from TED shows the … Read More

‘Catastrophe’ Claim Adds Fuel to Methane Debate

‘Catastrophe’ Claim Adds Fuel to Methane Debate

A Cornell University scientist's claims that oil and gas development is so harmful to the climate that methane emissions and oil and gas production in general need to be cut back immediately to avoid a "global catastrophe" are adding more fuel to the scientific debate over the climate implications of shale oil and gas production. … Read More

The Rise of El Niño in 1 Swell Image

The Rise of El Niño in 1 Swell Image

El Niño gawkers, rejoice. A new set of imagery provides a good visual clue yet another sign that El Niño conditions appear to be developing. On Tuesday, NASA’s Earth Observatory released a map showing ocean heights in the tropical Pacific in early May compared to May 1997, which preceded an El Niño formed against which all other El Niños are measu… Read More

Great Barriers: Reefs First Line of Coastal Defense

Great Barriers: Reefs First Line of Coastal Defense

A new study quantifies what many surfers already know: coral reefs help defuse incoming waves and create huge breaks. While that helps determine where to hang ten, it also hints at something much more important: reefs are a first line of defense for coastal communities when it comes to storm surge protection and that in many cases, they are much m… Read More

April Was 2nd Warmest Globally; Average for U.S.

April Was 2nd Warmest Globally; Average for U.S.

While April was an uneventful month temperature-wise in the U.S., with most areas experiencing near-average temperatures, the month was the second-warmest April on record globally, according to new NASA data. That makes April the 350th month in a row — more than 29 years — with above-average temperatures, largely caused by the buildup of manmade… Read More

What Does U.S. Look Like With 10 Feet of Sea Level Rise?

What Does U.S. Look Like With 10 Feet of Sea Level Rise?

New research indicates that climate change has already triggered an unstoppable decay of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The projected decay will lead to at least 4 feet of accelerating global sea level rise within the next two-plus centuries, and at least 10 feet of rise in the end. What does the U.S. look like with an ocean that is 10 feet higher? … Read More