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Wildfires Tied to Drought, Heat & Topography, Not Beetles

Wildfires Tied to Drought, Heat & Topography, Not Beetles

Climate change-driven drought and higher temperatures are among the biggest factors, in addition to topography, influencing wildfire spread in the West, according to a new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.… Read More

Satellites Show Vanuatu’s Scars From Cyclone Pam

Satellites Show Vanuatu’s Scars From Cyclone Pam

Cyclone Pam ripped through the small island nation of Vanuatu earlier this month, leaving behind scenes of utter devastation. Images on the ground have captured ripped up trees, destroyed houses and signs of cleanup underway. Now Landsat satellite images released by NASA Earth Observatory on Friday show the big picture of what those winds, in… Read More

The West Coast Is in Hot Water

The West Coast Is in Hot Water

Move over polar bears. Are starving sea lion pups the new face of climate change? This year’s slew of hungry pups washing ashore in California, which has generated a slew of media coverage replete with heart-tugging images, has roots in natural temperature fluctuations in the ocean. But in the coming decades, human-induced warming could make these… Read More

Two Months In and 2015 Is Record Warm

Two Months In and 2015 Is Record Warm

We may only be two months into 2015, but already the year is burning up the charts, setting up the possibility that it could topple 2014’s newly minted record for hottest year. Together, January and February were the warmest such period on record, according to global data released Wednesday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.… Read More

Wind Could Power 35 Percent of U.S. Electricity by 2050

Wind Could Power 35 Percent of U.S. Electricity by 2050

Wind energy in the U.S. has grown a lot over the last decade, providing about 4.5 percent of the nation’s electricity today. The U.S. Department of Energy believes it can grow a lot more — so much that wind turbines could supply as much as 35 percent of U.S. electricity by 2050. … Read More

Southern California’s Fog Falls Victim to Concrete

Southern California’s Fog Falls Victim to Concrete

Summertime fog that helps keep coastal southern California cool and damp appears to be melting away, and scientists who have documented nearly 70 years of its decline think they can explain why: concrete. The urban heat island effect, the phenomenon of cities warming faster than surrounding countryside, is a main culprit for a two-thirds reduction… Read More

Public Lands May Be America’s Best Climate Defense

Public Lands May Be America’s Best Climate Defense

Public lands protect forests that help store atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions while providing space for renewable energy development and protecting wildlife habitat and biodiversity, helping plants and animals adapt to climate change.… Read More

Artificial Photosynthesis Closer to Boosting Renewables

Artificial Photosynthesis Closer to Boosting Renewables

Scientists at Caltech think they have discovered a missing link in the development of artificial photosynthesis, according to a paper published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. … Read More

Gallery

Spring Temperature Trends Nationwide, spring has warmed an average of 1.9°F since 1970.

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