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Gulf of Maine Fishermen Face Warming ‘Double Whammy’

Gulf of Maine Fishermen Face Warming ‘Double Whammy’

After David Goethel set out on his 44-foot trawler on a calm New England day last week, he caught a third of his cod quota for the year in about 10 minutes. In 2010, Goethel was allowed to land about 60,000 pounds of cod. This year, following a population crash linked to warming waters, his limit was set at a meager 3,700 pounds. Oceans are … Read More

Lingering El Niño Could Mean Fewer Tornadoes This Year

Lingering El Niño Could Mean Fewer Tornadoes This Year

Last year brought a huge advance in tornado forecasting: the first seasonal severe weather forecast for the U.S. The forecast proved to be accurate and now researchers are back with a second forecast: a below average number of tornadoes and hailstorms for the coming year. The new forecast was presented at the American Meteorological Society’s … Read More

Solar Job Boom Continues As Prices Spur Demand

Solar Job Boom Continues As Prices Spur Demand

The U.S. solar power industry continued its hiring spree in 2015, growing nearly 12 times faster than overall U.S. employment. The solar industry has seen 123 percent growth in employment since 2010, adding 115,000 jobs in that time. Last year, industry employment totaled 208,859, with 35,000 new jobs added in 2015, up from about 31,000 in 2014 … Read More

El Niño Heat Peaks, But Impacts Still to Come

El Niño Heat Peaks, But Impacts Still to Come

It looks like this El Niño — which will rank among the strongest on record — has passed its peak in terms of tropical ocean temperatures, but it’s not going away anytime soon. In fact, the biggest El Niño impacts on the U.S. are probably still to come. The country has already started to feel the influence of El Niño with a recent spate of storms… Read More

Here’s How Software Could Save Salt Marshes

Here’s How Software Could Save Salt Marshes

It’s a mild and sunny summer day on the tidal salt marshes at Barn Island Wildlife Management Area, which sits across Little Narragansett bay from Stonington, Conn. Walking through a wide, dry stretch of marsh, Chris Elphick, a conservation biologist at the University of Connecticut, focuses a spotting scope on a group of little brown birds hidden … Read More

Human Impact Has Pushed Earth Into the Anthropocene

Human Impact Has Pushed Earth Into the Anthropocene

There is now compelling evidence to show that humanity’s impact on the Earth’s atmosphere, oceans and wildlife has pushed the world into a new geological epoch, according to a group of scientists. The question of whether humans’ combined environmental impact has tipped the planet into an “Anthropocene” – ending the current Holocene which began… Read More

U.S. Coal Production Dropped to 30-Year Low in 2015

U.S. Coal Production Dropped to 30-Year Low in 2015

Coal production in the U.S. has dropped to its lowest level in 30 years thanks in part to low natural gas prices and climate policies encouraging utilities to switch to natural gas to generate electricity. It was 1986 when coal production in the U.S. was as low as it is today, according to U.S. Energy Information Administration data released … Read More

Western Australia Wildfire Brings Widespread Destruction

Western Australia Wildfire Brings Widespread Destruction

On the back of hot, windy weather, a wildfire raging in Western Australia continues to wreak destruction across the state. The fire has burned more than 140,000 acres as of Friday and engulfed the small town of Yarloop. Lightning ignited the wildfires — known in Australia as bushfires — across Western Australia on Wednesday. The largest flared up … Read More