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Storm Surge Could Flood NYC 1 in Every 4 Years

Storm Surge Could Flood NYC 1 in Every 4 Years

When a storm, such as Hurricane Sandy, sets waters in New York Harbor rising, those sloshing seas are now 20 times more likely to overtop the Manhattan seawall than 170 years ago, a new study finds. The increased risk comes from a combination of sea level rise — which has raised water levels near New York City by nearly 1.5 feet since the mid-… Read More

New Ways to Visualize Increasingly Hot Weather in U.S.

New Ways to Visualize Increasingly Hot Weather in U.S.

The portion of days with warm weather in the U.S. have increased by 25 percent over the past 50 years according to a new data analysis. The analysis draws on publicly available data and represents the tip of the iceberg for how publicly available climate and weather data can be accessed and used. New York-based open data firm Enigma unde… Read More

Carbon Capture Faces Hurdles of Will, Not Technology

Carbon Capture Faces Hurdles of Will, Not Technology

The IPCC calls for carbon capture and storage technology to be used to reduce CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere to prevent the worst consequences of climate change from occurring. Scientists say the technology is ready, but there is no incentive to build carbon sequestration projects.… Read More

Okla. Utilities Hit Homes Using Solar With Extra Fee

Okla. Utilities Hit Homes Using Solar With Extra Fee

Anyone living in Oklahoma planning to power their home using a rooftop solar panel will soon be charged a fee for the right to do that while being connected to the local power grid. Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin signed the “solar surcharge” bill into law on Monday, permitting utilities to charge an extra fee to any customer using distributed power… Read More

Climate Models, Globe’s Oceans Put Stamp on Earth Day

Climate Models, Globe’s Oceans Put Stamp on Earth Day

For the stamp collector in search of an accurate portrayal of the globe’s oceans, look no further than the new U.S. Postal Service international Forever stamp. Released to commemorate Earth Day, the stamp features a snapshot of how high-tech climate models depict oceans. The Postal Service has a citizen advisory committee (who knew?) that looks fo… Read More

March of Global Warming: Month 4th Warmest on Record

March of Global Warming: Month 4th Warmest on Record

Though cool temperatures prevailed across the eastern U.S. and Canada through March, the month was the fourth warmest March on record globally, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Tuesday. It was the 38th March in a row with warmer-than-average temperatures. The ranking matches that from NASA data released earlier this… Read More

‘Oldest Living Things in the World’ Tell a Tale of Climate

‘Oldest Living Things in the World’ Tell a Tale of Climate

The spindly trunk of a Norway spruce reaches above the lichen-covered rocks. Nothing about the tree is remarkable aside from it being the only thing to reach more than a foot feet off the ground on a windswept plateau. Yet Rachel Sussman traveled the roughly 3,500 miles from her Brooklyn studio to western Sweden to photograph it. Its age is what d… Read More

Since 1st Earth Day, U.S. Temps Marching Upward

Since 1st Earth Day, U.S. Temps Marching Upward

t’s been 44 years since the first Earth Day was celebrated in 1970, and since that time, average temperatures have been rising across the U.S. Our interactive graphic shows a state-by-state analysis of these temperature trends. Average temperatures across most of the continental U.S. have actually been rising gradually for more than a century, at … Read More