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COP 21 — Why 2°C

Nov. 24, 2015

The 2015 Paris Climate Conference is from November 30 to December 11. Officially known as The 21st Conference of the Parties (or COP21) to the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), this meeting involves world leaders negotiating an international agreement to limit greenhouse gas emissions and hold planetary warming below 2°C (3.6°F) of preindustrial levels.

While 2°C may not sound like much, NASA estimates the global temperature rose between 4-7°C over the 5,000 years since the peak of the last ice age. According to the UK Met Office, the global mean temperature has already risen about 1°C since the industrial revolution (1850-1900), indicating that in the last century the temperature is climbing 10 times faster than when the ice sheets retreated. If current greenhouse gas emission trends continue, the amount of emissions allowed to keep warming below 2°C will be used up by mid-century.

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Video Package: Why 2°C?


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New Climate Central Graphics:

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Bernadette On-Site: UPDATES FROM PARIS

Chief Meteorologist Bernadette Woods Placky is on site in Paris, sending back video and sound during the first week of the conference. If you have something specific you would like, please contact Bernadette — bplacky@climatecentral.org.

See the FULL TOOLKIT on Vimeo >>

This week from Paris:

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Paris B-Roll
view/download here >>
(Password Protected: climatematters)

Interview: Chris Fields
view/download here >>
 
 

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Sea Level Rise: Mapping Choices  

If the current path of carbon emissions continues and causes up to 4°C (7.2°F) of warming, this could lock in enough sea level rise to submerge land which is now home to more than half a billion people globally and over 20 million right here in the United States. Unfolding over centuries, this rise would pose an ongoing threat to cities, infrastructure, cultural heritage and political stability; but limiting warming to 2°C (3.6°F) could cut the threat by more than half.

Below are a range of multimedia options to show the different impacts between 2°C vs. 4°C for both the U.S. and the rest of the globe.

Overview:

Full Report:

Multimedia:


Maps
U.S.  |  Global
 

Video Fly-overs of Cities
U.S.  |  Global
All on one page

Inundation Images
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2015 — Hottest Year on Record

2015 is set to be the hottest year on record and global warming is the overwhelming reason why.

Our World Weather Attribution initiative and colleagues at the University of Reading analyzed the driving forces behind this record. Specifically, they looked at the role of greenhouse gas emissions, El Niño, as well as solar activity and volcanic aerosols. According to the analysis, a large majority of the 2015 global surface temperature anomaly is due to anthropogenic forcing, with El Niño playing a smaller supporting role, and solar irradiance an even smaller factor. Volcanoes contribute very little at this time..

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Resources

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Supplemental Content from the Archive


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WXshift — Climate Change Indicators

Here are resources and analyses of climate change indicators that help contextualize both the local and global impacts of climate change:

Arctic Sea Ice

El Niño

Ocean Acidification

Carbon Dioxide

Extreme Heat

Snow Cover

Sea Level Rise

Land Ice

U.S. Wildfires

Global Temperature

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Spanish Offerings


Nueva Climático Central Gráficos:

Emisiones de EE.UU.
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