Climate Week 2015
  • Climate Week 2015
September 21-28, 2015

Climate Week 2015

September 21-28 marks the 7th annual Climate Week in New York City.  Climate Week 2015 aims to bring together an international group of leaders to discuss and promote a global movement in energy, technology, and business towards a more sustainable world. Events will be held throughout the week in NYC and online.

This week, we take an overall, big-picture look at how we really know that climate change is happening, and that our own emissions of greenhouse gases are a big part of the reason.  Here are resources and analysis of climate change indicators, as well as additional graphics, videos and projections that help contextualize both the local and global impacts of climate change.
 

Arctic Sea Ice

El Niño

Ocean Acidification

Carbon Dioxide

Extreme Heat

Snow Cover

Sea Level Rise

Land Ice

U.S. Wildfires

Global Temperature

 

ARCTIC SEA ICE
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QUICK FACTS

Arctic sea ice has been declining since the 1970s, and this year’s minimum extent was the fourth lowest on record.

The 10 lowest annual Arctic sea ice volumes have all been in the last 11 years.

Melting sea ice creates a feedback loop that accelerates global warming.
 


SOCIAL MEDIA

Arctic sea ice continues to melt away. See how thin it’s getting: http://bit.ly/1M96sME #climatematters

See why melting Arctic sea ice matters, even if you live thousands of miles away: http://bit.ly/1KdteCr #climatematters

More info: WXSHIFT.COM | CLIMATE MATTERS

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EL NIÑO
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QUICK FACTS

Globally, El Niño tends to boost global temperatures and likely contributed to 2014’s record heat.

El Niño can help start droughts, bust them, and break temperature records.

Some research suggests that climate change could double the likelihood of both extreme El Niño and La Niña events in the future.
 


SOCIAL MEDIA

The biggest El Niño impacts in the U.S. happen during the winter months. Here are some: http://bit.ly/1vKCnZ6 #climatematters

El Niño can have a big effect on global temps, adding extra heat into the atmosphere: http://bit.ly/1Yvm1oJ #climatematters

More info: WXSHIFT.COM | CLIMATE MATTERS

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OCEAN ACIDIFICATION
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QUICK FACTS

The average pH of ocean surface water decreased over 30% (8.21 to 8.10) since preindustrial times.

Oceans are becoming more acidic nearly 50 times faster than any known change.

By one estimate, ocean acidification will cost the global economy $1 trillion annually by 2100.
 


SOCIAL MEDIA

Some estimates show that the impacts of ocean acidification could cost the global economy $1 trillion annually by 2100 http://bit.ly/1QtFxvH #climatematters

About ¼ of the CO2 humans produce every year is absorbed by the oceans, making them more acidic. http://bit.ly/1PkdKOe #climatematters

More info: WXSHIFT.COM | CLIMATE MATTERS

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CARBON DIOXIDE
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QUICK FACTS

Since the first measurements at Mauna Loa in 1958, CO2 levels in the atmosphere have risen from 313 ppm to over 400 ppm.

Scientists estimate that the last time CO2 levels were this high was at least 800,000 and possibly over 3 million years ago, when the Arctic was 32°F warmer and sea levels were up to 90 feet higher.

Carbon dioxide is a long-lived greenhouse gas, so even if all carbon emissions stopped today, global temperatures would keep rising and climate impacts would continue to be felt.


SOCIAL MEDIA

Atmospheric CO2 levels may fluctuate season to season, but overall it just keeps on rising: http://bit.ly/1AruSwu #climatematters

800,000 years of CO2 data show just how (really, really) high current levels are: http://bit.ly/1AKqrMh #climatematters

More info: WXSHIFT.COM | CLIMATE MATTERS

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EXTREME HEAT
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QUICK FACTS

Extremely hot days that used to happen once every 20 years in the 1960s now occur every 10-15 years.

Overall, daily record high temperatures are outpacing record lows.

Some research suggests that the 40 largest U.S. cities could see their number of excessive heat days increase five-fold by 2050.


SOCIAL MEDIA

Another sign our Earth is warming: daily record highs are outpacing record lows across the U.S.: http://bit.ly/1PzmznC #climatematters

Through the decades, see how record daily highs are outpacing record lows with climate change. http://bit.ly/1NuhrSF #climatematters

More info: WXSHIFT.COM | CLIMATE MATTERS

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SNOW COVER
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QUICK FACTS

In the northern stretches of the globe, snow cover receded from a peak of 10.28 million square miles in 1979 to a record low 3.69 million square miles set in 2013.

Less snow cover allows the Earth to absorb more sunlight instead of reflecting it away.

That starts a feedback loop: rising temperatures, more melting, and then further temperature increases.
 


SOCIAL MEDIA

In 2015, spring snowpack in the western U.S. was below normal for the 11th time in the last 16 years: http://bit.ly/1C2DANV #climatematters

In the Northern Hemisphere, snow cover receded from a 10.28 million square mile maximum set in 1979 to a minimum of only 3.69 million square miles set in 2013 #climatematters

More info: WXSHIFT.COM | CLIMATE MATTERS

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SEA LEVEL RISE
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QUICK FACTS

Satellite and tide gauge measurements show that sea level has risen by about 8" since 1880, on average across the globe — that’s .07" per year.

This rate of rise increased significantly from 1993 on — to .11-.13" per year.

Unless adaptation measures are taken, sea level rise could cost the globe $1 trillion annually by 2050.
 


SOCIAL MEDIA

Global warming is causing sea levels to rise. Here’s a look how high they could get by 2100: http://bit.ly/1ncQoAA #climatematters

Want to see how sea level rise will affect your area? Explore here: http://bit.ly/1n1MaHD #climatematters

More info: WXSHIFT.COM | CLIMATE MATTERS

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LAND ICE

QUICK FACTS

Greenland and Antarctica alone contain 75% of the world’s fresh water, and if they melt entirely, sea levels could rise by 240 feet.

Antarctica has been losing more than 24 cubic miles of land ice per year since 2002.

Nearly one-sixth of the world’s population relies on glacial runoff for fresh water, and a loss of glaciers leads to a decrease in runoff.


SOCIAL MEDIA

Antarctic sea ice may remain high, but land ice is decreasing: http://bit.ly/1qfVzdC #climatematters

If Greenland and Antarctica melted entirely, sea levels could rise by 240 feet. http://bit.ly/1NHtRqf #climatematters

More info: WXSHIFT.COM | CLIMATE MATTERS

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U.S. WILDFIRES
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QUICK FACTS

Since 1970, the annual average number of wildfires larger than 1,000 acres has more than doubled in the western U.S.

From 2002-13, wildfires in the western U.S. routinely worsened air quality by 5-15 times normal levels for cities with 100 miles of fires.

Projections indicate that every 1.8°F rise in temperature could quadruple the area burned each year in the western U.S.
 


SOCIAL MEDIA

The number of large wildfires and area burned across the West is rising due to the impacts of climate change: http://bit.ly/1MNJNGL #climatematters

# of large wildfires & area burned across the West is rising due to the impacts of climate change: http://bit.ly/1fGoTwe #climatematters

More info: WXSHIFT.COM | CLIMATE MATTERS

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GLOBAL TEMPERATURES
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QUICK FACTS

Overall, the planet has warmed about 1.6°F since the 1880s, and the 10 warmest years on record have all occurred since 1998.

This warming has contributed to melting Arctic sea ice, rising seas, shifting ecosystems, droughts, and heat waves.

Temperatures are expected to rise even more steeply in the coming decades unless greenhouse gas emissions are curbed.
 


SOCIAL MEDIA

New data from NOAA: 2015 was the hottest summer on record, and is on track for hottest year globally: http://bit.ly/1W5e1sr #climatematters

U.S. is having its 9th-hottest year on record so far. Some states on track for their hottest year: http://bit.ly/1QkCsOu #climatematters

More info: WXSHIFT.COM | CLIMATE MATTERS

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Another Indicator of Climate Change: More Heavy Precipitation
We also expect to see more heavy rain as a result of climate change. With hotter temperatures, more water evaporates off the oceans, and the atmosphere can hold more moisture. That means that there is often a lot more water available to come down as rain – and as snow.
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State-based: See your state >> See download options >>
  View interactive | Embeddable code  

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