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Thoughts on everything from climate modeling to energy policy.

‘Atmospheric River’ Smashes Records in Pacific Northwest

‘Atmospheric River’ Smashes Records in Pacific Northwest

A barrage of unusually intense early-autumn storm systems swept across the Pacific Northwest this weekend, bringing hurricane force winds and dumping enough rain to smash all-time monthly rainfall records from Seattle to Portland. In Seattle and Olympia, Wash., Sept. 28 was the wettest September day on record. In Seattle, 1.71 inches of rain fell, … Read More

A Forecast for the American West: Hot and Hotter

A Forecast for the American West: Hot and Hotter

Over the summer and on into the fall, images of flames, smoke plumes, firefighting teams and ruined homes have been on replay, and with good reason: As of Aug. 31, this year tied the record for total acreage burned by wildfires, according to the National Interagency Fire Center. More than 8.4 million acres have burned to date — an area larger than … Read More

Image of the Day: The Wildfires that Continue to Burn

Image of the Day: The Wildfires that Continue to Burn

A view of the numerous fires that continued to rage throughout the northwestern United States as of September 17, 2012 taken from NASA’s Aqua satellite. You can also monitor and obtain stats in on the blazes in real-time using Climate Central’s new interactive wildfires map. Wildfires such as these have been burning throughout the Western U.S. … Read More

Image of the Day: Otters Are Climate-Saving Creatures

Image of the Day: Otters Are Climate-Saving Creatures

After studying 40 years worth of data, researchers from the University of California Santa Cruz have found that sea otters play an active role in combating climate change. And it's all thanks to their love of sea urchin, a natural predator of the carbon-sucking coastal seaweed, kelp. In the absence of otters, urchins dine like kings, but in their … Read More

Image of the Day: The Tongue of the Malaspina Glacier

Image of the Day: The Tongue of the Malaspina Glacier

A Landsat 7 satellite image shows the tongue of the Malaspina Glacier, the largest glacier in Alaska and the largest piedmont glacier — a glacier that ends on flat land rather than in the ocean — in the world. Research has shown that glaciers around the world have been retreating at unprecedented rates, and Alaska, which has only 5 percent of the t… Read More

Image of the Day: Drought Forces Cows to Moo-ve East

Image of the Day: Drought Forces Cows to Moo-ve East

Ranchers out West are being forced to move their cattle eastward in order to escape extreme drought conditions. Add to that, many ranchers are also dealing with wildfires making the urgency even greater to save their cattle. One Wyoming rancher moved his herd 330 miles east, a seven hour trip with 120 head of cattle to graze on a friend’s prairie … Read More

Image of the Day: Tsunami Debris Beached in Oregon

Image of the Day: Tsunami Debris Beached in Oregon

A dock that was formerly attached to a Japanese port appeared on an Oregon beach this week.… Read More

Image of the Day: Low Water Flow Triggers Avian Cholera

Image of the Day: Low Water Flow Triggers Avian Cholera

More than 10,000 migrating birds in the U.S. have died from an outbreak of avian cholera caused by reduced water flowing through marshlands of Oregon and California, according to federal wildlife officials. The drier conditions force the birds to gather in smaller areas and those crowded conditions help spread the disease. Avian cholera appears in… Read More