Blogs Section
Thoughts on everything from climate modeling to energy policy.

Ferocious Storm Set to Explode in North Atlantic

Ferocious Storm Set to Explode in North Atlantic

What is currently a relatively innocuous weather system spreading light snow, freezing rain, and rain across the eastern U.S. is forecast to explode, through a process known to meteorologists as “bombogenesis,” into a ferocious storm once it emerges over the North Atlantic. Computer models indicate that the storm may intensify so significantly that… Read More

Monster Storm Lashing Outer Reaches of Alaska

Monster Storm Lashing Outer Reaches of Alaska

At its most intense point, the storm had an air pressure reading of about 936 mb or slightly lower, roughly equivalent to a Category 4 hurricane, and similar to the intensity of Hurricane Sandy as that storm moved toward the New Jersey coastline in October. (In general, the lower the air pressure, the stronger the storm.)… Read More

Climate Central Leads 2012’s Climate Coverage

Climate Central Leads 2012’s Climate Coverage

Year-end numbers for media coverage of climate change were released Wednesday in an annual report by The Daily Climate, and while that coverage fell 2 percent, there were some interesting numbers. According to The Daily Climate’s archives, worldwide coverage by many major news organizations gave roughly the same amount of coverage this year as the… Read More

Hurricane Sandy Looks More Likely to Slam Eastern U.S.

Hurricane Sandy Looks More Likely to Slam Eastern U.S.

Recent studies have shown that blocking patterns have appeared with greater frequency and intensity in recent years, which some scientists think may be related to the loss of Arctic sea ice as a result global warming.… Read More

Melting Permafrost Will Boost Temps, But Not Quickly

Melting Permafrost Will Boost Temps, But Not Quickly

Climate scientists have long known that human-generated greenhouse emissions are only part of the story with global warming. A rising planetary temperature sets in motion all sorts of secondary effects that can boost the temperature even higher — effects like melting Arctic sea ice, rising levels of heat-trapping water vapor in the atmosphere, and … Read More

Visualizing 2012’s Record Arctic Sea Ice Melt

Visualizing 2012’s Record Arctic Sea Ice Melt

On average, more and more sea ice has been melting each summer, with widespread implications for the rest of the world. When white, highly reflective ice melts to reveal darker seawater, the ocean absorbs heat from the sun, warming the water and air and making it more likely that there will be even more melting in later years.… Read More

A Closer Look at Arctic Sea Ice Melt and Extreme Weather

A Closer Look at Arctic Sea Ice Melt and Extreme Weather

Since March, the amount of Arctic sea ice that has disappeared is about equal to the areas of Texas and Canada, combined. As a result such extensive sea ice losses, says the study, the jet stream, which has always been rather capricious, is behaving differently now. … Read More

Image of the Day: Fish Sticks! A One-Two Climate Punch

Image of the Day: Fish Sticks! A One-Two Climate Punch

For Alaska pollock, the white fish primarily used in fish-sticks and one of the most economically valuable fisheries in the world, climate change is a one-two punch. According to NOAA, rising water temperatures reduce the abundance of their preferred food while increasing the population size of their predators. Found most commonly in the Bering … Read More